Use of propofol for short duration procedures in children with long chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiencies

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The medication propofol, commonly used for anesthesia, has been avoided in patients with mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAODs) due to concerns that it contains long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), and because of reports of severe side effects in some critically ill patients receiving high-dose propofol infusions that mimic some of the symptoms regularly found in FAOD patients. In this secondary analysis, we examined the outcomes of 8 children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency who were repeatedly sedated for an electroretinogram (ERG) as part of a longitudinal study of the progression of chorioretinopathy commonly found in this population. A total of 39 sedated ERG procedures were completed using propofol for sedation. The propofol dosing, estimated total energy needs of the subject, and inpatient dietary intake recording were completed in 32 of these procedures. The LCFAs in the propofol provided approximately 1.0% of the average total daily energy needs. The sedation with propofol resulted in no adverse side effects and was safely used in this short duration procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-142
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular Genetics and Metabolism
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase
Propofol
Fatty Acids
Proteins
3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases
Oxidation
Critical Illness
Longitudinal Studies
Trifunctional Protein Deficiency With Myopathy And Neuropathy
Inpatients
Anesthesia

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Fatty acid oxidation disorders
  • Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
  • Propofol
  • Trifunctional protein deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Use of propofol for short duration procedures in children with long chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiencies",
abstract = "The medication propofol, commonly used for anesthesia, has been avoided in patients with mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAODs) due to concerns that it contains long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), and because of reports of severe side effects in some critically ill patients receiving high-dose propofol infusions that mimic some of the symptoms regularly found in FAOD patients. In this secondary analysis, we examined the outcomes of 8 children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency who were repeatedly sedated for an electroretinogram (ERG) as part of a longitudinal study of the progression of chorioretinopathy commonly found in this population. A total of 39 sedated ERG procedures were completed using propofol for sedation. The propofol dosing, estimated total energy needs of the subject, and inpatient dietary intake recording were completed in 32 of these procedures. The LCFAs in the propofol provided approximately 1.0{\%} of the average total daily energy needs. The sedation with propofol resulted in no adverse side effects and was safely used in this short duration procedure.",
keywords = "Anesthesia, Fatty acid oxidation disorders, Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, Propofol, Trifunctional protein deficiency",
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AU - Harding, Cary

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