Underrepresentation of Women and Minorities in the United States IR Academic Physician Workforce

Mikhail C.S.S. Higgins, Wei Ting Hwang, Chase Richard, Christina H. Chapman, Angelique Laporte, Stefan Both, Charles R. Thomas, Curtiland Deville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose To assess the United States interventional radiology (IR) academic physician workforce diversity and comparative specialties. Methods Public registries were used to assess demographic differences among 2012 IR faculty and fellows, diagnostic radiology (DR) faculty and residents, DR subspecialty fellows (pediatric, abdominal, neuroradiology, and musculoskeletal), vascular surgery and interventional cardiology trainees, and 2010 US medical school graduates and US Census using binomial tests with .001 significance level (Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Significant trends in IR physician representation were evaluated from 1992 to 2012. Results Women (15.4%), blacks (2.0%), and Hispanics (6.2%) were significantly underrepresented as IR fellows compared with the US population. Women were underrepresented as IR (7.3%) versus DR (27.8%) faculty and IR fellows (15.4%) versus medical school graduates (48.3%), DR residents (27.8%), pediatric radiology fellows (49.4%), and vascular surgery trainees (27.7%) (all P < .001). IR ranked last in female representation among radiologic subspecialty fellows. Blacks (1.8%, 2.1%, respectively, for IR faculty and fellows); Hispanics (1.8%, 6.2%); and combined American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (1.8%, 0) showed no significant differences in representation as IR fellows compared with IR faculty, DR residents, other DR fellows, or interventional cardiology or vascular surgery trainees. Over 20 years, there was no significant increase in female or black representation as IR fellows or faculty. Conclusions Women, blacks, and Hispanics are underrepresented in the IR academic physician workforce relative to the US population. Given prevalent health care disparities and an increasingly diverse society, research and training efforts should address IR physician workforce diversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1837-1844.e2
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Higgins, M. C. S. S., Hwang, W. T., Richard, C., Chapman, C. H., Laporte, A., Both, S., Thomas, C. R., & Deville, C. (2016). Underrepresentation of Women and Minorities in the United States IR Academic Physician Workforce. Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, 27(12), 1837-1844.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2016.06.011