Transmission of HIV-1 in the face of neutralizing antibodies

Catherine A. Blish, Wendy M. Blay, Nancy Haigwood, Julie Overbaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In most cases of HIV-1 transmission, only a subset of variants is transmitted from the index case to the newly infected individual. Understanding the characteristics of these transmitted variants may aid in developing new methods to halt the spread of HIV-1. Studies evaluating the genotypic and antigenic properties of transmitted variants have provided insights into how the selective pressures applied during different modes of transmission uniquely imprint the infecting viruses. In the setting of sexual transmission, variants with increased neutralization sensitivity appeared to be selected during transmission in discordant subtype C-infected couples, although transmitted variants from different risk groups and HIV-1 subtypes did not demonstrate increased neutralization sensitivity, suggesting this may not be a consistent feature of transmitted variants. Studies of both mother to child transmission (MTCT) and superinfection, where preexisting NAbs are present at the time of exposure, provide opportunities to analyze whether the breadth and potency of the NAb response influence the incidence of new infections. MTCT resulted in selection for variants that were resistant to maternal antibodies, suggesting that maternal antibodies can protect the baby from those variants that are susceptible to the antibodies present. There are some data to suggest that poor neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are present in cases of superinfection, although these data are preliminary. Defining the characteristics of the viruses transmitted in the presence and absence of NAbs as well as defining the NAb responses that fail to protect from infection during MTCT and superinfection may provide critical insights into the antibody responses that are needed for effective vaccines and other prophylactic therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-587
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent HIV Research
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neutralizing Antibodies
HIV-1
Superinfection
Mothers
Antibody Formation
Antibodies
Viruses
Infection
Vaccines
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • HIV-1
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Mother to child transmission
  • Neutralizing antibodies
  • Superinfection
  • Transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Transmission of HIV-1 in the face of neutralizing antibodies. / Blish, Catherine A.; Blay, Wendy M.; Haigwood, Nancy; Overbaugh, Julie.

In: Current HIV Research, Vol. 5, No. 6, 11.2007, p. 578-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blish, Catherine A. ; Blay, Wendy M. ; Haigwood, Nancy ; Overbaugh, Julie. / Transmission of HIV-1 in the face of neutralizing antibodies. In: Current HIV Research. 2007 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 578-587.
@article{227d13182b1241db8bcc5cfa3921b2b6,
title = "Transmission of HIV-1 in the face of neutralizing antibodies",
abstract = "In most cases of HIV-1 transmission, only a subset of variants is transmitted from the index case to the newly infected individual. Understanding the characteristics of these transmitted variants may aid in developing new methods to halt the spread of HIV-1. Studies evaluating the genotypic and antigenic properties of transmitted variants have provided insights into how the selective pressures applied during different modes of transmission uniquely imprint the infecting viruses. In the setting of sexual transmission, variants with increased neutralization sensitivity appeared to be selected during transmission in discordant subtype C-infected couples, although transmitted variants from different risk groups and HIV-1 subtypes did not demonstrate increased neutralization sensitivity, suggesting this may not be a consistent feature of transmitted variants. Studies of both mother to child transmission (MTCT) and superinfection, where preexisting NAbs are present at the time of exposure, provide opportunities to analyze whether the breadth and potency of the NAb response influence the incidence of new infections. MTCT resulted in selection for variants that were resistant to maternal antibodies, suggesting that maternal antibodies can protect the baby from those variants that are susceptible to the antibodies present. There are some data to suggest that poor neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are present in cases of superinfection, although these data are preliminary. Defining the characteristics of the viruses transmitted in the presence and absence of NAbs as well as defining the NAb responses that fail to protect from infection during MTCT and superinfection may provide critical insights into the antibody responses that are needed for effective vaccines and other prophylactic therapeutics.",
keywords = "HIV-1, Monoclonal antibodies, Mother to child transmission, Neutralizing antibodies, Superinfection, Transmission",
author = "Blish, {Catherine A.} and Blay, {Wendy M.} and Nancy Haigwood and Julie Overbaugh",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.2174/157016207782418461",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "578--587",
journal = "Current HIV Research",
issn = "1570-162X",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transmission of HIV-1 in the face of neutralizing antibodies

AU - Blish, Catherine A.

AU - Blay, Wendy M.

AU - Haigwood, Nancy

AU - Overbaugh, Julie

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - In most cases of HIV-1 transmission, only a subset of variants is transmitted from the index case to the newly infected individual. Understanding the characteristics of these transmitted variants may aid in developing new methods to halt the spread of HIV-1. Studies evaluating the genotypic and antigenic properties of transmitted variants have provided insights into how the selective pressures applied during different modes of transmission uniquely imprint the infecting viruses. In the setting of sexual transmission, variants with increased neutralization sensitivity appeared to be selected during transmission in discordant subtype C-infected couples, although transmitted variants from different risk groups and HIV-1 subtypes did not demonstrate increased neutralization sensitivity, suggesting this may not be a consistent feature of transmitted variants. Studies of both mother to child transmission (MTCT) and superinfection, where preexisting NAbs are present at the time of exposure, provide opportunities to analyze whether the breadth and potency of the NAb response influence the incidence of new infections. MTCT resulted in selection for variants that were resistant to maternal antibodies, suggesting that maternal antibodies can protect the baby from those variants that are susceptible to the antibodies present. There are some data to suggest that poor neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are present in cases of superinfection, although these data are preliminary. Defining the characteristics of the viruses transmitted in the presence and absence of NAbs as well as defining the NAb responses that fail to protect from infection during MTCT and superinfection may provide critical insights into the antibody responses that are needed for effective vaccines and other prophylactic therapeutics.

AB - In most cases of HIV-1 transmission, only a subset of variants is transmitted from the index case to the newly infected individual. Understanding the characteristics of these transmitted variants may aid in developing new methods to halt the spread of HIV-1. Studies evaluating the genotypic and antigenic properties of transmitted variants have provided insights into how the selective pressures applied during different modes of transmission uniquely imprint the infecting viruses. In the setting of sexual transmission, variants with increased neutralization sensitivity appeared to be selected during transmission in discordant subtype C-infected couples, although transmitted variants from different risk groups and HIV-1 subtypes did not demonstrate increased neutralization sensitivity, suggesting this may not be a consistent feature of transmitted variants. Studies of both mother to child transmission (MTCT) and superinfection, where preexisting NAbs are present at the time of exposure, provide opportunities to analyze whether the breadth and potency of the NAb response influence the incidence of new infections. MTCT resulted in selection for variants that were resistant to maternal antibodies, suggesting that maternal antibodies can protect the baby from those variants that are susceptible to the antibodies present. There are some data to suggest that poor neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are present in cases of superinfection, although these data are preliminary. Defining the characteristics of the viruses transmitted in the presence and absence of NAbs as well as defining the NAb responses that fail to protect from infection during MTCT and superinfection may provide critical insights into the antibody responses that are needed for effective vaccines and other prophylactic therapeutics.

KW - HIV-1

KW - Monoclonal antibodies

KW - Mother to child transmission

KW - Neutralizing antibodies

KW - Superinfection

KW - Transmission

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38949141652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38949141652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2174/157016207782418461

DO - 10.2174/157016207782418461

M3 - Article

C2 - 18045114

AN - SCOPUS:38949141652

VL - 5

SP - 578

EP - 587

JO - Current HIV Research

JF - Current HIV Research

SN - 1570-162X

IS - 6

ER -