Transgenic miR132 alters neuronal spine density and impairs novel object recognition memory

Katelin F. Hansen, Kensuke Sakamoto, Gary A. Wayman, Soren Impey, Karl Obrietan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inducible gene expression plays a central role in neuronal plasticity, learning, and memory, and dysfunction of the underlying molecular events can lead to severe neuronal disorders. In addition to coding transcripts (mRNAs), non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) appear to play a role in these processes. For instance, the CREB-regulated miRNA miR132 has been shown to affect neuronal structure in an activity-dependent manner, yet the details of its physiological effects and the behavioral consequences in vivo remain unclear. To examine these questions, we employed a transgenic mouse strain that expresses miR132 in forebrain neurons. Morphometric analysis of hippocampal neurons revealed that transgenic miR132 triggers a marked increase in dendritic spine density. Additionally, miR132 transgenic mice exhibited a decrease in the expression of MeCP2, a protein implicated in Rett Syndrome and other disorders of mental retardation. Consistent with these findings, miR132 transgenic mice displayed significant deficits in novel object recognition. Together, these data support a role for miR132 as a regulator of neuronal structure and function, and raise the possibility that dysregulation of miR132 could contribute to an array of cognitive disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere15497
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Object recognition
MicroRNAs
Transgenic Mice
Neurons
Spine
genetically modified organisms
Data storage equipment
Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2
microRNA
Gene expression
Rett Syndrome
Plasticity
mice
Dendritic Spines
Neuronal Plasticity
neurons
Prosencephalon
Intellectual Disability
Messenger RNA
behavior disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Transgenic miR132 alters neuronal spine density and impairs novel object recognition memory. / Hansen, Katelin F.; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Wayman, Gary A.; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 11, e15497, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hansen, Katelin F. ; Sakamoto, Kensuke ; Wayman, Gary A. ; Impey, Soren ; Obrietan, Karl. / Transgenic miR132 alters neuronal spine density and impairs novel object recognition memory. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 11.
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