Transfrontal and Transsphenoidal Approaches to Pediatric Craniopharyngioma: A National Perspective

Yimo Lin, Daniel Hansen, Christina Sayama, I. Wen Pan, Sandi Lam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study compared transsphenoidal (TS) and transfrontal (TF) approaches to craniopharyngioma utilizing a national database. Methods: The Kids' Inpatient Database (2003, 2006, and 2009) was surveyed for patients with a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma who underwent a subset of surgical interventions to compare TS and TF surgery. Demographics, hospital variables, and complications/comorbidities were analyzed with multivariate regression. Results: 314 admissions (TS = 104, TF = 210) were identified. The mean age was 14.8 (TS) versus 9.8 (TF) years (p < 0.001). The mean number of diagnoses was 4.6 (TS) versus 6.2 (TF) (p < 0.001). Diabetes insipidus was associated with 38% (TS) and 69% (TF). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak affected 19% TS and 4% TF resections. Other complications and comorbidities included postoperative stroke (2% TS vs. 5% TF), panhypopituitarism (5 vs. 8%), death (0 vs. 1%), cranial nerve deficits (1 vs. 6%), thrombotic events (7 vs. 17%), and seizures (0 vs. 12%). 98% of patients were discharged home after a mean 6-day length of stay (LOS) after TS, whereas 90% of TF patients had a LOS of 12 days. TS cases were more likely to be privately insured (68%) and from higher income brackets (61%) than TF ones (56 and 2%, respectively) (p < 0.05). In multivariate regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, number of diagnoses, surgical approach, hospital volume, and insurance type, the TS approach was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak (OR 10, p < 0.001). More documented diagnoses (OR 16-60, p < 0.01) and TF approach (OR 2.6, p < 0.01) were associated with an increased incidence of other complications and comorbidities. Age younger than 10 (β-coefficient 2.3, p = 0.01), more diagnoses (β-coefficient 1.2, p < 0.001), and TF approach (β- coefficient 3.0, p < 0.01) were associated with increased LOS. A higher number of diagnoses were associated with nonhome discharge destinations (β-coefficient 1.29, p < 0.001). Conclusion: TS surgery was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak but shorter LOS; TF surgery was associated with an increased incidence of other complications. Patients undergoing TS surgery were more likely to have private insurance and a higher family income bracket.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Neurosurgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 23 2017

Fingerprint

Craniopharyngioma
Pediatrics
Length of Stay
Comorbidity
Incidence
Insurance
Databases
Diabetes Insipidus
Cranial Nerves
Inpatients
Seizures
Stroke
Demography
Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

Keywords

  • Craniopharyngioma, pediatric
  • Craniotomy
  • Transfrontal approach
  • Transsphenoidal approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Transfrontal and Transsphenoidal Approaches to Pediatric Craniopharyngioma : A National Perspective. / Lin, Yimo; Hansen, Daniel; Sayama, Christina; Pan, I. Wen; Lam, Sandi.

In: Pediatric Neurosurgery, 23.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{de913653319f4be68b0c19f0dfa4c96f,
title = "Transfrontal and Transsphenoidal Approaches to Pediatric Craniopharyngioma: A National Perspective",
abstract = "Introduction: This study compared transsphenoidal (TS) and transfrontal (TF) approaches to craniopharyngioma utilizing a national database. Methods: The Kids' Inpatient Database (2003, 2006, and 2009) was surveyed for patients with a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma who underwent a subset of surgical interventions to compare TS and TF surgery. Demographics, hospital variables, and complications/comorbidities were analyzed with multivariate regression. Results: 314 admissions (TS = 104, TF = 210) were identified. The mean age was 14.8 (TS) versus 9.8 (TF) years (p < 0.001). The mean number of diagnoses was 4.6 (TS) versus 6.2 (TF) (p < 0.001). Diabetes insipidus was associated with 38{\%} (TS) and 69{\%} (TF). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak affected 19{\%} TS and 4{\%} TF resections. Other complications and comorbidities included postoperative stroke (2{\%} TS vs. 5{\%} TF), panhypopituitarism (5 vs. 8{\%}), death (0 vs. 1{\%}), cranial nerve deficits (1 vs. 6{\%}), thrombotic events (7 vs. 17{\%}), and seizures (0 vs. 12{\%}). 98{\%} of patients were discharged home after a mean 6-day length of stay (LOS) after TS, whereas 90{\%} of TF patients had a LOS of 12 days. TS cases were more likely to be privately insured (68{\%}) and from higher income brackets (61{\%}) than TF ones (56 and 2{\%}, respectively) (p < 0.05). In multivariate regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, number of diagnoses, surgical approach, hospital volume, and insurance type, the TS approach was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak (OR 10, p < 0.001). More documented diagnoses (OR 16-60, p < 0.01) and TF approach (OR 2.6, p < 0.01) were associated with an increased incidence of other complications and comorbidities. Age younger than 10 (β-coefficient 2.3, p = 0.01), more diagnoses (β-coefficient 1.2, p < 0.001), and TF approach (β- coefficient 3.0, p < 0.01) were associated with increased LOS. A higher number of diagnoses were associated with nonhome discharge destinations (β-coefficient 1.29, p < 0.001). Conclusion: TS surgery was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak but shorter LOS; TF surgery was associated with an increased incidence of other complications. Patients undergoing TS surgery were more likely to have private insurance and a higher family income bracket.",
keywords = "Craniopharyngioma, pediatric, Craniotomy, Transfrontal approach, Transsphenoidal approach",
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T1 - Transfrontal and Transsphenoidal Approaches to Pediatric Craniopharyngioma

T2 - A National Perspective

AU - Lin, Yimo

AU - Hansen, Daniel

AU - Sayama, Christina

AU - Pan, I. Wen

AU - Lam, Sandi

PY - 2017/2/23

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N2 - Introduction: This study compared transsphenoidal (TS) and transfrontal (TF) approaches to craniopharyngioma utilizing a national database. Methods: The Kids' Inpatient Database (2003, 2006, and 2009) was surveyed for patients with a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma who underwent a subset of surgical interventions to compare TS and TF surgery. Demographics, hospital variables, and complications/comorbidities were analyzed with multivariate regression. Results: 314 admissions (TS = 104, TF = 210) were identified. The mean age was 14.8 (TS) versus 9.8 (TF) years (p < 0.001). The mean number of diagnoses was 4.6 (TS) versus 6.2 (TF) (p < 0.001). Diabetes insipidus was associated with 38% (TS) and 69% (TF). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak affected 19% TS and 4% TF resections. Other complications and comorbidities included postoperative stroke (2% TS vs. 5% TF), panhypopituitarism (5 vs. 8%), death (0 vs. 1%), cranial nerve deficits (1 vs. 6%), thrombotic events (7 vs. 17%), and seizures (0 vs. 12%). 98% of patients were discharged home after a mean 6-day length of stay (LOS) after TS, whereas 90% of TF patients had a LOS of 12 days. TS cases were more likely to be privately insured (68%) and from higher income brackets (61%) than TF ones (56 and 2%, respectively) (p < 0.05). In multivariate regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, number of diagnoses, surgical approach, hospital volume, and insurance type, the TS approach was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak (OR 10, p < 0.001). More documented diagnoses (OR 16-60, p < 0.01) and TF approach (OR 2.6, p < 0.01) were associated with an increased incidence of other complications and comorbidities. Age younger than 10 (β-coefficient 2.3, p = 0.01), more diagnoses (β-coefficient 1.2, p < 0.001), and TF approach (β- coefficient 3.0, p < 0.01) were associated with increased LOS. A higher number of diagnoses were associated with nonhome discharge destinations (β-coefficient 1.29, p < 0.001). Conclusion: TS surgery was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak but shorter LOS; TF surgery was associated with an increased incidence of other complications. Patients undergoing TS surgery were more likely to have private insurance and a higher family income bracket.

AB - Introduction: This study compared transsphenoidal (TS) and transfrontal (TF) approaches to craniopharyngioma utilizing a national database. Methods: The Kids' Inpatient Database (2003, 2006, and 2009) was surveyed for patients with a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma who underwent a subset of surgical interventions to compare TS and TF surgery. Demographics, hospital variables, and complications/comorbidities were analyzed with multivariate regression. Results: 314 admissions (TS = 104, TF = 210) were identified. The mean age was 14.8 (TS) versus 9.8 (TF) years (p < 0.001). The mean number of diagnoses was 4.6 (TS) versus 6.2 (TF) (p < 0.001). Diabetes insipidus was associated with 38% (TS) and 69% (TF). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak affected 19% TS and 4% TF resections. Other complications and comorbidities included postoperative stroke (2% TS vs. 5% TF), panhypopituitarism (5 vs. 8%), death (0 vs. 1%), cranial nerve deficits (1 vs. 6%), thrombotic events (7 vs. 17%), and seizures (0 vs. 12%). 98% of patients were discharged home after a mean 6-day length of stay (LOS) after TS, whereas 90% of TF patients had a LOS of 12 days. TS cases were more likely to be privately insured (68%) and from higher income brackets (61%) than TF ones (56 and 2%, respectively) (p < 0.05). In multivariate regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, number of diagnoses, surgical approach, hospital volume, and insurance type, the TS approach was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak (OR 10, p < 0.001). More documented diagnoses (OR 16-60, p < 0.01) and TF approach (OR 2.6, p < 0.01) were associated with an increased incidence of other complications and comorbidities. Age younger than 10 (β-coefficient 2.3, p = 0.01), more diagnoses (β-coefficient 1.2, p < 0.001), and TF approach (β- coefficient 3.0, p < 0.01) were associated with increased LOS. A higher number of diagnoses were associated with nonhome discharge destinations (β-coefficient 1.29, p < 0.001). Conclusion: TS surgery was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak but shorter LOS; TF surgery was associated with an increased incidence of other complications. Patients undergoing TS surgery were more likely to have private insurance and a higher family income bracket.

KW - Craniopharyngioma, pediatric

KW - Craniotomy

KW - Transfrontal approach

KW - Transsphenoidal approach

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