Topsy turvy: Functions of climbing and mossy fibers in the vestibulo-cerebellum

Neal H. Barmack, Vadim Yakhnitsa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The cerebellum's role in sensory-motor control and adaptation is undisputed. However, a key hypothesis pertaining to the function of cerebellar circuitry lacks experimental support. It is universally assumed that the discharge of mossy fibers accounts for modulation of Purkinje cell "simple spikes" (SSs). This assumption acts as a prism through which all other functions of cerebellar circuitry are viewed. The vestibulo-cerebellum (nodulus and uvula) receives a large, unilateral, vestibular primary afferent mossy fiber projection. We can test its role in modulating Purkinje cell SSs by recording the modulated activity of both mossy fiber terminals and Purkinje cell SSs evoked by identical natural vestibular stimulation. Sinusoidal rotation about the longitudinal axis (roll) modulates the activity of vestibular primary afferent mossy and climbing fibers as well as Purkinje cell SSs and complex spikes (CSs). Remarkably, vestibular primary afferent mossy fibers discharge 180 degrees out of phase with SSs. This indicates that mossy fibers cannot account for SS modulation unless an inhibitory synapse is interposed between mossy fibers or vestibular climbing fibers and Purkinje cells. The authors review several experiments that address the relative contributions of mossy and climbing fiber afferents to the modulation of SSs. They conclude that climbing fibers, not mossy fibers, are primarily responsible for the modulation of SSs as well as CSs and they propose revised functions for these two afferent systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-236
Number of pages16
JournalNeuroscientist
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Golgi cell
  • granule cell
  • inferior olive
  • nodulus
  • stellate cell
  • uvula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

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