To be Truly Alive: Motivation Among Prison Inmate Hospice Volunteers and the Transformative Process of End-of-Life Peer Care Service

Kristin G. Cloyes, Susan J. Rosenkranz, Dawn Wold, Patricia H. Berry, Katherine P. Supiano

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    20 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Some US prisons are meeting the growing need for end-of-life care through inmate volunteer programs, yet knowledge of the motivations of inmate caregivers is underdeveloped. This study explored the motivations of inmate hospice volunteers from across Louisiana State (n = 75) through an open-ended survey, a grounded theory approach to analysis, and comparison of responses by experience level and gender. Participants expressed complex motivations; Inter-related themes on personal growth, social responsibility and ethical service to vulnerable peers suggested that inmate caregivers experience an underlying process of personal and social transformation, from hospice as a source of positive self-identity to peer-caregiving as a foundation for community. Better understanding of inmate caregiver motivations and processes will help prisons devise effective and sustainable end of life peer-care programs.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)735-748
    Number of pages14
    JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
    Volume31
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 11 2014

    Keywords

    • end of life
    • hospice volunteer
    • peer-care
    • prison hospice

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

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