Tissue taurine content, activity of taurine synthesis enzymes and conjugated bile acid composition of taurine-deprived and taurine-supplemented rhesus monkey infants at 6 and 12 mo of age

J. A. Sturman, J. M. Messing, S. S. Rossi, A. F. Hofmann, M. Neuringer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concentrations of taurine were measured in a number of tissues from rhesus monkeys fed a taurine-free human infant formula with or without taurine supplementation for 6 mo and 12 mo. At 6 mo, tissue taurine content was significantly greater in the monkeys supplemented with taurine, but by 12 mo, there was no longer a significant difference. Activities of enzymes involved in taurine biosynthesis did not differ between the groups at any age. There was no difference in biliary bile acid class composition between the groups, but the proportion of bile acids conjugated with taurine reflected the tissue taurine content (i.e., was significantly greater in monkeys supplemented with taurine at 6 mo). This difference also disappeared by 12 mo. These results indicate that dependence on dietary sources of taurine persists for at least the first 6 mo but declines by 12 mo. Thus, dietary taurine content is reflected in the tissue taurine content and proportion of bile acids conjugated with taurine in infant rhesus monkeys at least until 6 mo of age, but the body taurine status in animals 12 mo old or older is not an indicator of previous status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)854-862
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bile acids
  • Human infant formula
  • Infant rhesus monkeys
  • Taurine
  • Taurine biosynthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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