The Validity of Self-Reported Medication Adherence as an Outcome in Clinical Trials of Adherence-Promotion Interventions

Findings from the MACH14 Study

Jane M. Simoni, David Huh, Yan Wang, Ira B. Wilson, Nancy R. Reynolds, Robert H. Remien, Kathy Goggin, Robert Gross, Marc I. Rosen, Neil Schneiderman, Julia Arnsten, Carol E. Golin, Judith A. Erlen, David Bangsberg, Honghu Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In medication adherence-promotion trials, participants in the intervention arm are often cognizant of the researcher’s aim to improve adherence; this may lead to their inflating reports of their own adherence compared to control arm participants. Using data from 1,247 HIV-positive participants across eight U.S. Studies in the Multi-site Adherence Collaboration on HIV (MACH14) collaboration, we evaluated the validity of self-reported adherence by examining whether its association with two more objective outcomes [1], electronically monitored adherence and [2] viral load, varied by study arm. After adjusting for potential confounders, there was no evidence of greater overestimation of self-reported adherence among intervention arm participants, supporting its potential as a trial outcome indicator.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2285-2290
Number of pages6
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Viral Load
HIV-1
Research Personnel
Clinical Trials
HIV

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intervention studies
  • Medication adherence assessment
  • Social desirability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The Validity of Self-Reported Medication Adherence as an Outcome in Clinical Trials of Adherence-Promotion Interventions : Findings from the MACH14 Study. / Simoni, Jane M.; Huh, David; Wang, Yan; Wilson, Ira B.; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Remien, Robert H.; Goggin, Kathy; Gross, Robert; Rosen, Marc I.; Schneiderman, Neil; Arnsten, Julia; Golin, Carol E.; Erlen, Judith A.; Bangsberg, David; Liu, Honghu.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 2285-2290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simoni, JM, Huh, D, Wang, Y, Wilson, IB, Reynolds, NR, Remien, RH, Goggin, K, Gross, R, Rosen, MI, Schneiderman, N, Arnsten, J, Golin, CE, Erlen, JA, Bangsberg, D & Liu, H 2014, 'The Validity of Self-Reported Medication Adherence as an Outcome in Clinical Trials of Adherence-Promotion Interventions: Findings from the MACH14 Study', AIDS and Behavior, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 2285-2290. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-014-0905-x
Simoni, Jane M. ; Huh, David ; Wang, Yan ; Wilson, Ira B. ; Reynolds, Nancy R. ; Remien, Robert H. ; Goggin, Kathy ; Gross, Robert ; Rosen, Marc I. ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Arnsten, Julia ; Golin, Carol E. ; Erlen, Judith A. ; Bangsberg, David ; Liu, Honghu. / The Validity of Self-Reported Medication Adherence as an Outcome in Clinical Trials of Adherence-Promotion Interventions : Findings from the MACH14 Study. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 12. pp. 2285-2290.
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