The relationship between body mass index and unintended pregnancy: results from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth

Bliss Kaneshiro, Alison Edelman, Nichole Carlson, Mark Nichols, Jeffrey Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The study was conducted to characterize the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and unintended pregnancy, contraceptive use patterns, and perceived fertility. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional, nationally representative database (2002 National Survey of Family Growth). Unintended pregnancy was compared among BMI groups [normal (2), overweight (25-30 m/kg2) and obese (>30 m/kg2)]. Analyses also evaluated the association between demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral and health-related variables and BMI. Multiple logistic regression with adjustment for sampling design was used to measure associations of interest. Results: BMI data were available from 6690 nonpregnant women. Of these, 3600 (53.6%) were normal weight, 1643 (25%) were overweight and 1447 (21.4%) were obese. Compared to women with normal BMIs, the risk of unintended pregnancy in the last 5 years did not differ among overweight [adjusted OR 0.95 (95% CI 0.77-1.17)] or obese [adjusted OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.70-1.09)] women. There were no differences in contraceptive use patterns or perceived fertility among BMI groups. Conclusion: Data from the 2002 NSFG do not support an association between obesity and unintended pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-238
Number of pages5
JournalContraception
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Pregnancy
Growth
Contraceptive Agents
Fertility
Obesity
Logistic Models
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Databases
Weights and Measures
Health

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Contraceptive use
  • Obesity
  • Perceived fertility
  • Unintended pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The relationship between body mass index and unintended pregnancy : results from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. / Kaneshiro, Bliss; Edelman, Alison; Carlson, Nichole; Nichols, Mark; Jensen, Jeffrey.

In: Contraception, Vol. 77, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 234-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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