The long-term outcome of retained foreign bodies in pediatric gunshot wounds.

Ioanna G. Mazotas, Nicholas Hamilton, Mary A. McCubbins, Martin S. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this retrospective review was to determine the long-term consequences of retained bullet foreign bodies in children after gunshot injury. All children managed for gunshot wounds at an urban, level I pediatric trauma center were evaluated, identifying those discharged with retained bullet foreign bodies. Overall, 244 children were treated for gunshot wounds, 107 (44%) had retained foreign bodies, 24 (22%) experienced long-term complications related to retained foreign bodies, and 14 (13%) required removal. Complications occur in a significant subset of pediatric patients with retained bullets. Prophylactic bullet removal appears unnecessary, although close outpatient follow-up is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-245
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Gunshot Wounds
Foreign Bodies
Pediatrics
Trauma Centers
Outpatients
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The long-term outcome of retained foreign bodies in pediatric gunshot wounds. / Mazotas, Ioanna G.; Hamilton, Nicholas; McCubbins, Mary A.; Keller, Martin S.

In: Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, Vol. 19, No. 4, 10.2012, p. 240-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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