The joint effect of bias awareness and self-reported prejudice on intergroup anxiety and intentions for intergroup contact

Sylvia P. Perry, John F. Dovidio, Mary C. Murphy, Michelle Van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two correlational studies investigated the joint effect of bias awareness-a new individual difference measure that assesses Whites' awareness and concern about their propensity to be biased-and prejudice on Whites' intergroup anxiety and intended intergroup contact. Using a community sample (Study 1), we found the predicted Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction. Prejudice was more strongly related to interracial anxiety among those high (vs. low) in bias awareness. Study 2 investigated potential behavioral consequences in an important real world context: medical students' intentions for working primarily with minority patients. Study 2 replicated the Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction and further demonstrated that interracial anxiety mediated medical students' intentions to work with minority populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Bias awareness
  • Intergroup anxiety
  • Interracial contact
  • Self-knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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