The interconnections project: Development and evaluation of a community-based depression program for African American violence survivors

Christina Nicolaidis, Stéphanie Wahab, Jammie Trimble, Angie Mejia, S. Renee Mitchell, Dora Raymaker, Mary Jo Thomas, Vanessa Timmons, A. Star Waters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Multi-faceted depression care programs based within the healthcare system have been found to be effective, but may not fully address the needs of African American Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) survivors, many of whom are not seeking depression care in healthcare settings. OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a multifaceted, community-based depression care program (the Interconnections Project) for African American women with a history of IPV. METHODS: We used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop, implement, and evaluate the intervention. Participants were African American women who had current depressive symptoms and a lifetime history of IPV. They participated in a 6-month intervention where a peer advocate provided education, skills training, and case management services, and used Motivational Interviewing to support self-management behaviors. We conducted pre-intervention and post-intervention assessments using quantitative and qualitative data. RESULTS: Fifty-nine women participated, with 92 % attending any sessions and 51 % attending at least 6 h of intervention activities. Intervention changes made to better accommodate participants' unpredictable schedules improved participation rates. Participants noted high levels of satisfaction with the program. There were significant improvements in depression severity (PHQ-9 13.9 to 7.9, p <0.001), self-efficacy, self-management behaviors, and self-esteem (all p <0.001), but no increase in use of antidepressants. Common themes related to why the program was helpful included that the program was by and for African American women, that it fostered trust, and that it taught self-management strategies with practical, lasting value. CONCLUSION: Culturally specific, community-based interventions led by peer advocates may be a promising way to help African American IPV survivors effectively address depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-538
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Violence
African Americans
Survivors
Depression
Self Care
Community-Based Participatory Research
Motivational Interviewing
Delivery of Health Care
Case Management
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Antidepressive Agents
Appointments and Schedules
Education
Intimate Partner Violence

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • community interventions
  • community-based participatory research
  • depression
  • intimate partner violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The interconnections project : Development and evaluation of a community-based depression program for African American violence survivors. / Nicolaidis, Christina; Wahab, Stéphanie; Trimble, Jammie; Mejia, Angie; Mitchell, S. Renee; Raymaker, Dora; Thomas, Mary Jo; Timmons, Vanessa; Waters, A. Star.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 530-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicolaidis, C, Wahab, S, Trimble, J, Mejia, A, Mitchell, SR, Raymaker, D, Thomas, MJ, Timmons, V & Waters, AS 2013, 'The interconnections project: Development and evaluation of a community-based depression program for African American violence survivors', Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 530-538. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-012-2270-7
Nicolaidis, Christina ; Wahab, Stéphanie ; Trimble, Jammie ; Mejia, Angie ; Mitchell, S. Renee ; Raymaker, Dora ; Thomas, Mary Jo ; Timmons, Vanessa ; Waters, A. Star. / The interconnections project : Development and evaluation of a community-based depression program for African American violence survivors. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 530-538.
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AU - Wahab, Stéphanie

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AU - Mejia, Angie

AU - Mitchell, S. Renee

AU - Raymaker, Dora

AU - Thomas, Mary Jo

AU - Timmons, Vanessa

AU - Waters, A. Star

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