The impact of depressive symptoms on patient-provider communication in HIV care

Charles R. Jonassaint, Carlton Haywood, Philip (Todd) Korthuis, Lisa A. Cooper, Somnath (Som) Saha, Victoria Sharp, Jonathon Cohn, Richard D. Moore, Mary Catherine Beach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persons with HIV who develop depression have worse medical adherence and outcomes. Poor patient-provider communication may play a role in these outcomes. This cross-sectional study evaluated the influence of patient depression on the quality of patient-provider communication. Patient-provider visits (n=406) at four HIV care sites were audio-recorded and coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Negative binomial and linear regressions using generalized estimating equations tested the association of depressive symptoms, as measured by the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression scale (CES-D), with RIAS measures and postvisit patient-rated quality of care and provider-reported regard for his or her patient. The patients, averaged 45 years of age (range =20-77), were predominately male (n=286, 68.5%), of black race (n=250, 60%), and on antiretroviral medications (n=334, 80%). Women had greater mean CES-D depression scores (12.0) than men (10.6; p=0.03). There were no age, race, or education differences in depression scores. Visits with patients reporting severe depressive symptoms compared to those reporting none/mild depressive symptoms were longer and speech speed was slower. Patients with severe depressive symptoms did more emotional rapport building but less social rapport building, and their providers did more data gathering/counseling (ps

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1185-1192
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Communication
HIV
Depression
communication
systems analysis
epidemiology
interaction
Epidemiology
cross-sectional study
counseling
medication
Quality of Health Care
regression
human being
Counseling
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
education
Education

Keywords

  • communication
  • depression
  • HIV
  • patient satisfaction
  • quality of health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

The impact of depressive symptoms on patient-provider communication in HIV care. / Jonassaint, Charles R.; Haywood, Carlton; Korthuis, Philip (Todd); Cooper, Lisa A.; Saha, Somnath (Som); Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathon; Moore, Richard D.; Beach, Mary Catherine.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 25, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 1185-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jonassaint, Charles R. ; Haywood, Carlton ; Korthuis, Philip (Todd) ; Cooper, Lisa A. ; Saha, Somnath (Som) ; Sharp, Victoria ; Cohn, Jonathon ; Moore, Richard D. ; Beach, Mary Catherine. / The impact of depressive symptoms on patient-provider communication in HIV care. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 9. pp. 1185-1192.
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