The Detection of Pulmonary Metastases with Pathologic Correlation in a Canine Model: Effect of Breathing on the Accuracy of Helical CT

Fergus Coakley, Mervyn D. Cohen, David J. Waters, Mary M. Davis, Boaz Karmazyn, Rene Gonin, Mark P. Hanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary nodule detection by helical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Before sacrifice, four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent helical CT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2. Helical CT was performed during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted postmortem. Hard-copy CT images were reviewed by 10 radiologists; each circled all suspected metastases. Helical CT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true- and false-positive diagnoses. RESULTS. One hundred thirty-two macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases were identified by pathologic examination. Of these metastases, the 10 radiologists identified an average of 40 metastases on breath-hold helical CT and an average of 36 on non-breath-hold CT. These findings were insignificant when analyzed by logistic regression for repeated measures (p = .8). CONCLUSION. In our animal model, helical CT performed during normal resting breathing resulted in no significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1615-1618
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume169
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Spiral Computed Tomography
Canidae
Respiration
Neoplasm Metastasis
Lung
Osteosarcoma
Animal Models
Logistic Models
Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

The Detection of Pulmonary Metastases with Pathologic Correlation in a Canine Model : Effect of Breathing on the Accuracy of Helical CT. / Coakley, Fergus; Cohen, Mervyn D.; Waters, David J.; Davis, Mary M.; Karmazyn, Boaz; Gonin, Rene; Hanna, Mark P.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 169, No. 6, 1997, p. 1615-1618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coakley, Fergus ; Cohen, Mervyn D. ; Waters, David J. ; Davis, Mary M. ; Karmazyn, Boaz ; Gonin, Rene ; Hanna, Mark P. / The Detection of Pulmonary Metastases with Pathologic Correlation in a Canine Model : Effect of Breathing on the Accuracy of Helical CT. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1997 ; Vol. 169, No. 6. pp. 1615-1618.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary nodule detection by helical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Before sacrifice, four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent helical CT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2. Helical CT was performed during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted postmortem. Hard-copy CT images were reviewed by 10 radiologists; each circled all suspected metastases. Helical CT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true- and false-positive diagnoses. RESULTS. One hundred thirty-two macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases were identified by pathologic examination. Of these metastases, the 10 radiologists identified an average of 40 metastases on breath-hold helical CT and an average of 36 on non-breath-hold CT. These findings were insignificant when analyzed by logistic regression for repeated measures (p = .8). CONCLUSION. In our animal model, helical CT performed during normal resting breathing resulted in no significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary nodule detection by helical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Before sacrifice, four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent helical CT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2. Helical CT was performed during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted postmortem. Hard-copy CT images were reviewed by 10 radiologists; each circled all suspected metastases. Helical CT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true- and false-positive diagnoses. RESULTS. One hundred thirty-two macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases were identified by pathologic examination. Of these metastases, the 10 radiologists identified an average of 40 metastases on breath-hold helical CT and an average of 36 on non-breath-hold CT. These findings were insignificant when analyzed by logistic regression for repeated measures (p = .8). CONCLUSION. In our animal model, helical CT performed during normal resting breathing resulted in no significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases.

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