Ten myths about decision-making capacity

Linda Ganzini, Ladislav Volicer, William A. Nelson, Ellen Fox, Arthur R. Derse

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    As a matter of practical reality, what role patients will play in decisions about their health care is determined by whether their clinicians judge them to have decision-making capacity. Because so much hinges on assessments of capacity, clinicians who work with patients have an ethical obligation to understand this concept. This article, based on a report prepared by the National Ethics Committee (NEC) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), seeks to provide clinicians with practical information about decision-making capacity and how it is assessed. A study of clinicians and ethics committee chairs carried out under the auspices of the NEC identified the following 10 common myths clinicians hold about decision-making capacity: (1) decision-making capacity and competency are the same; (2) lack of decision-making capacity can be presumed when patients go against medical advice; (3) there is no need to assess decision-making capacity unless patients go against medical advice; (4) decision-making capacity is an "all or nothing" phenomenon; (5) cognitive impairment equals lack of decision-making capacity; (6) lack of decision-making capacity is a permanent condition; (7) patients who have not been given relevant and consistent information about their treatment lack decision-making capacity; (8) all patients with certain psychiatric disorders lack decision-making capacity; (9) patients who are involuntarily committed lack decision-making capacity; and (10) only mental health experts can assess decision-making capacity. By describing and debunking these common misconceptions, this article attempts to prevent potential errors in the clinical assessment of decision-making capacity, thereby supporting patients' right to make choices about their own health care.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
    Volume6
    Issue number3 SUPPL.
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 2005

    Fingerprint

    Decision Making
    Ethics Committees
    Veterans Health
    Delivery of Health Care
    United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    Patient Rights
    Psychiatry
    Mental Health

    Keywords

    • Decision-making capacity
    • Ethics
    • Informed consent

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Ten myths about decision-making capacity. / Ganzini, Linda; Volicer, Ladislav; Nelson, William A.; Fox, Ellen; Derse, Arthur R.

    In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 6, No. 3 SUPPL., 05.2005.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ganzini, Linda ; Volicer, Ladislav ; Nelson, William A. ; Fox, Ellen ; Derse, Arthur R. / Ten myths about decision-making capacity. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 3 SUPPL.
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