Survivor Feedback on a Safety Decision Aid Smartphone Application for College-Age Women in Abusive Relationships

Megan Lindsay, Jill Theresa Messing, Jonel Thaller, Adrienne Baldwin, Amber Clough, Tina Bloom, Karen Eden, Nancy Glass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

College-age women are at high risk for dating violence and tend to seek services at rates lower than older adults. Young women are more likely to look to their peers or to technology as a forum for accessing safety resources. This study explores a prototype smart phone application ("app") that is a safety decision aid for female survivors of dating violence. The app is intended to assist young women to assess the danger in their abusive relationship, set priorities for safety, and develop a personalized safety plan. Through focus group sessions and individual interviews, 38 female college students in 4 states (Arizona, Maryland, Missouri, and Oregon) who self-identified as survivors of abusive relationships reviewed and provided feedback on the usefulness, understandability, appropriateness, and comprehensiveness of the app. The focus group sessions and interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Participants were positive about the potential of the app to provide personalized information about abusive dating relationships and appropriate resources in a private, safe, and nonjudgmental manner. Detailed feedback from survivors and recommendations for further development of the app are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-388
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Technology in Human Services
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

decision aid
Decision Support Techniques
Smartphones
Application programs
Survivors
Feedback
Safety
Focus Groups
violence
Interviews
interview
resources
Group
Students
Technology
Smartphone
student
Intimate Partner Violence
Violence

Keywords

  • college students
  • dating violence
  • decision aid
  • emerging adults
  • intimate partner violence
  • smart phone app

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Survivor Feedback on a Safety Decision Aid Smartphone Application for College-Age Women in Abusive Relationships. / Lindsay, Megan; Messing, Jill Theresa; Thaller, Jonel; Baldwin, Adrienne; Clough, Amber; Bloom, Tina; Eden, Karen; Glass, Nancy.

In: Journal of Technology in Human Services, Vol. 31, No. 4, 2013, p. 368-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindsay, Megan ; Messing, Jill Theresa ; Thaller, Jonel ; Baldwin, Adrienne ; Clough, Amber ; Bloom, Tina ; Eden, Karen ; Glass, Nancy. / Survivor Feedback on a Safety Decision Aid Smartphone Application for College-Age Women in Abusive Relationships. In: Journal of Technology in Human Services. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 368-388.
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