Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women

Shahbudin H. Rahimtoola, Andrew J. Bennett, Gary L. Grunkemeier, Peter Block, Albert Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Coronary bypass surgery in women is associated with lower survival than in men. We need to know whether this is because of patient-related factors and whether the lower survival is present in all subgroups of patients and for all time periods during which the surgery was performed. Methods and Results. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 1979 women and 6927 men. The operative mortality was 2.7% for women and 1.9% for men (P=.02). The higher operative mortality in women was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (5.4% versus 2.8%, P=.009) and those with stable angina (2.6% versus 1.5%, P=.006). The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 18-year survival for women was 86±0.9%, 70±1.5%, 50±2.5%, and 37±6.4%, respectively, and for men, 88±0.4%, 73±0.7%, 54±1.2%, and 42±1.9%, respectively (P=.03). The lower survival in women compared with men was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (at 10 years, 53±3.7% versus 65±1.6%, P=.0006) and in those with stable angina (at 10 years, 69±1.8% versus 73±0.8%, P=.005). At 15 years, the incidence of reoperation was 26±2.4% versus 28±1.2% and of myocardial infarction, 30±2.8% versus 32±1.3%, P=NS for either. The incidence of no angina or mild angina was 70% in women and 78% in men, P2, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-78
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation
Volume88
Issue number5 PART 2
StatePublished - Nov 1993

Fingerprint

Survival
Stable Angina
Left Ventricular Function
Mortality
Incidence
Unstable Angina
Reoperation
Myocardial Infarction

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Angina
  • Bypass
  • Diabetes meilitus
  • Hypertension
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Rahimtoola, S. H., Bennett, A. J., Grunkemeier, G. L., Block, P., & Starr, A. (1993). Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women. Circulation, 88(5 PART 2), 71-78.

Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women. / Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Grunkemeier, Gary L.; Block, Peter; Starr, Albert.

In: Circulation, Vol. 88, No. 5 PART 2, 11.1993, p. 71-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahimtoola, SH, Bennett, AJ, Grunkemeier, GL, Block, P & Starr, A 1993, 'Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women', Circulation, vol. 88, no. 5 PART 2, pp. 71-78.
Rahimtoola SH, Bennett AJ, Grunkemeier GL, Block P, Starr A. Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women. Circulation. 1993 Nov;88(5 PART 2):71-78.
Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H. ; Bennett, Andrew J. ; Grunkemeier, Gary L. ; Block, Peter ; Starr, Albert. / Survival at 15 to 18 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina in women. In: Circulation. 1993 ; Vol. 88, No. 5 PART 2. pp. 71-78.
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AU - Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.

AU - Bennett, Andrew J.

AU - Grunkemeier, Gary L.

AU - Block, Peter

AU - Starr, Albert

PY - 1993/11

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N2 - Background. Coronary bypass surgery in women is associated with lower survival than in men. We need to know whether this is because of patient-related factors and whether the lower survival is present in all subgroups of patients and for all time periods during which the surgery was performed. Methods and Results. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 1979 women and 6927 men. The operative mortality was 2.7% for women and 1.9% for men (P=.02). The higher operative mortality in women was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (5.4% versus 2.8%, P=.009) and those with stable angina (2.6% versus 1.5%, P=.006). The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 18-year survival for women was 86±0.9%, 70±1.5%, 50±2.5%, and 37±6.4%, respectively, and for men, 88±0.4%, 73±0.7%, 54±1.2%, and 42±1.9%, respectively (P=.03). The lower survival in women compared with men was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (at 10 years, 53±3.7% versus 65±1.6%, P=.0006) and in those with stable angina (at 10 years, 69±1.8% versus 73±0.8%, P=.005). At 15 years, the incidence of reoperation was 26±2.4% versus 28±1.2% and of myocardial infarction, 30±2.8% versus 32±1.3%, P=NS for either. The incidence of no angina or mild angina was 70% in women and 78% in men, P2, P

AB - Background. Coronary bypass surgery in women is associated with lower survival than in men. We need to know whether this is because of patient-related factors and whether the lower survival is present in all subgroups of patients and for all time periods during which the surgery was performed. Methods and Results. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 1979 women and 6927 men. The operative mortality was 2.7% for women and 1.9% for men (P=.02). The higher operative mortality in women was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (5.4% versus 2.8%, P=.009) and those with stable angina (2.6% versus 1.5%, P=.006). The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 18-year survival for women was 86±0.9%, 70±1.5%, 50±2.5%, and 37±6.4%, respectively, and for men, 88±0.4%, 73±0.7%, 54±1.2%, and 42±1.9%, respectively (P=.03). The lower survival in women compared with men was seen in those with three-vessel disease or greater and abnormal left ventricular function (at 10 years, 53±3.7% versus 65±1.6%, P=.0006) and in those with stable angina (at 10 years, 69±1.8% versus 73±0.8%, P=.005). At 15 years, the incidence of reoperation was 26±2.4% versus 28±1.2% and of myocardial infarction, 30±2.8% versus 32±1.3%, P=NS for either. The incidence of no angina or mild angina was 70% in women and 78% in men, P2, P

KW - Aging

KW - Angina

KW - Bypass

KW - Diabetes meilitus

KW - Hypertension

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