Survival 15 to 20 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina

Shahbudin H. Rahimtoola, Cindy L. Fessler, Gary L. Grunkemeier, Albert Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the 15- to 20-year outcome of coronary bypass surgery in patients with angina. Background. Coronary bypass surgery has been performed for >20 years; we need to know the expected outcome of a very long-term follow-up. Methods. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 7,529 patients from 1969 to 1988. Results. The 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year survival rates (mean ± SE) were 88 ± 1, 73 ± 1, 53 ± 1 and 38 ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. Compared with patients operated on in 1974 to 1988 (n = 7,026), patients operated on in 1969 to 1973 (n = 503) were younger and had less coronary artery disease but had a higher operative mortality rate and a shorter long-term survival time; 15- and 20-year survival of the 1969 to 1973 cohort was 47 ± 2% and 33 ± 3%, respectively. The 1974 to 1988 cohort of patients had a 2.1% operative mortality rate and a 10- and 15-year survival probability of 74 ± 1% and 55 ± 2%, respectively. For 2,128 patients with "normal" left ventricular function, the 10- and 15-year survival probability was 82 ± 1% and 64 ± 3%, respectively, and for 2,413 patients with "abnormal" left ventricular function, it was 66 ± 1% and 47 ± 3%, respectively (p <0.0001); for men it was 74 ± 1% and 56 ± 2%, respectively, and for women, 70 ± 2% and 52 ± 5%, respectively, p <0.05. The actuarial percentages of reoperation and myocardial infarction at 15 years were 33 ± 2% and 26 ± 2%, respectively; these values did not differ significantly between men and women. There was a significant (p <0.001) difference between men and women in angina status; 81% of the men versus 74% of the women had no angina or mild angina at the most recent follow-up study. Conclusions. Coronary bypass surgery is an effective form of therapy for angina (for 15 to 20 years) in both men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-157
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Survival
Left Ventricular Function
Stable Angina
Mortality
Unstable Angina
Reoperation
Coronary Artery Disease
Survival Rate
Myocardial Infarction
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Survival 15 to 20 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina. / Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.; Fessler, Cindy L.; Grunkemeier, Gary L.; Starr, Albert.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 1993, p. 151-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H. ; Fessler, Cindy L. ; Grunkemeier, Gary L. ; Starr, Albert. / Survival 15 to 20 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1993 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 151-157.
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abstract = "Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the 15- to 20-year outcome of coronary bypass surgery in patients with angina. Background. Coronary bypass surgery has been performed for >20 years; we need to know the expected outcome of a very long-term follow-up. Methods. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 7,529 patients from 1969 to 1988. Results. The 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year survival rates (mean ± SE) were 88 ± 1, 73 ± 1, 53 ± 1 and 38 ± 3{\%}, respectively, for the whole group. Compared with patients operated on in 1974 to 1988 (n = 7,026), patients operated on in 1969 to 1973 (n = 503) were younger and had less coronary artery disease but had a higher operative mortality rate and a shorter long-term survival time; 15- and 20-year survival of the 1969 to 1973 cohort was 47 ± 2{\%} and 33 ± 3{\%}, respectively. The 1974 to 1988 cohort of patients had a 2.1{\%} operative mortality rate and a 10- and 15-year survival probability of 74 ± 1{\%} and 55 ± 2{\%}, respectively. For 2,128 patients with {"}normal{"} left ventricular function, the 10- and 15-year survival probability was 82 ± 1{\%} and 64 ± 3{\%}, respectively, and for 2,413 patients with {"}abnormal{"} left ventricular function, it was 66 ± 1{\%} and 47 ± 3{\%}, respectively (p <0.0001); for men it was 74 ± 1{\%} and 56 ± 2{\%}, respectively, and for women, 70 ± 2{\%} and 52 ± 5{\%}, respectively, p <0.05. The actuarial percentages of reoperation and myocardial infarction at 15 years were 33 ± 2{\%} and 26 ± 2{\%}, respectively; these values did not differ significantly between men and women. There was a significant (p <0.001) difference between men and women in angina status; 81{\%} of the men versus 74{\%} of the women had no angina or mild angina at the most recent follow-up study. Conclusions. Coronary bypass surgery is an effective form of therapy for angina (for 15 to 20 years) in both men and women.",
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T1 - Survival 15 to 20 years after coronary bypass surgery for angina

AU - Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.

AU - Fessler, Cindy L.

AU - Grunkemeier, Gary L.

AU - Starr, Albert

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the 15- to 20-year outcome of coronary bypass surgery in patients with angina. Background. Coronary bypass surgery has been performed for >20 years; we need to know the expected outcome of a very long-term follow-up. Methods. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 7,529 patients from 1969 to 1988. Results. The 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year survival rates (mean ± SE) were 88 ± 1, 73 ± 1, 53 ± 1 and 38 ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. Compared with patients operated on in 1974 to 1988 (n = 7,026), patients operated on in 1969 to 1973 (n = 503) were younger and had less coronary artery disease but had a higher operative mortality rate and a shorter long-term survival time; 15- and 20-year survival of the 1969 to 1973 cohort was 47 ± 2% and 33 ± 3%, respectively. The 1974 to 1988 cohort of patients had a 2.1% operative mortality rate and a 10- and 15-year survival probability of 74 ± 1% and 55 ± 2%, respectively. For 2,128 patients with "normal" left ventricular function, the 10- and 15-year survival probability was 82 ± 1% and 64 ± 3%, respectively, and for 2,413 patients with "abnormal" left ventricular function, it was 66 ± 1% and 47 ± 3%, respectively (p <0.0001); for men it was 74 ± 1% and 56 ± 2%, respectively, and for women, 70 ± 2% and 52 ± 5%, respectively, p <0.05. The actuarial percentages of reoperation and myocardial infarction at 15 years were 33 ± 2% and 26 ± 2%, respectively; these values did not differ significantly between men and women. There was a significant (p <0.001) difference between men and women in angina status; 81% of the men versus 74% of the women had no angina or mild angina at the most recent follow-up study. Conclusions. Coronary bypass surgery is an effective form of therapy for angina (for 15 to 20 years) in both men and women.

AB - Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the 15- to 20-year outcome of coronary bypass surgery in patients with angina. Background. Coronary bypass surgery has been performed for >20 years; we need to know the expected outcome of a very long-term follow-up. Methods. Using actuarial techniques, we determined the outcome of coronary bypass surgery performed for chronic stable and unstable angina in 7,529 patients from 1969 to 1988. Results. The 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year survival rates (mean ± SE) were 88 ± 1, 73 ± 1, 53 ± 1 and 38 ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. Compared with patients operated on in 1974 to 1988 (n = 7,026), patients operated on in 1969 to 1973 (n = 503) were younger and had less coronary artery disease but had a higher operative mortality rate and a shorter long-term survival time; 15- and 20-year survival of the 1969 to 1973 cohort was 47 ± 2% and 33 ± 3%, respectively. The 1974 to 1988 cohort of patients had a 2.1% operative mortality rate and a 10- and 15-year survival probability of 74 ± 1% and 55 ± 2%, respectively. For 2,128 patients with "normal" left ventricular function, the 10- and 15-year survival probability was 82 ± 1% and 64 ± 3%, respectively, and for 2,413 patients with "abnormal" left ventricular function, it was 66 ± 1% and 47 ± 3%, respectively (p <0.0001); for men it was 74 ± 1% and 56 ± 2%, respectively, and for women, 70 ± 2% and 52 ± 5%, respectively, p <0.05. The actuarial percentages of reoperation and myocardial infarction at 15 years were 33 ± 2% and 26 ± 2%, respectively; these values did not differ significantly between men and women. There was a significant (p <0.001) difference between men and women in angina status; 81% of the men versus 74% of the women had no angina or mild angina at the most recent follow-up study. Conclusions. Coronary bypass surgery is an effective form of therapy for angina (for 15 to 20 years) in both men and women.

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