Spiritual feasts

Meaningful conversations between hospice volunteers and patients

Sally Planalp, Melanie R. Trost, Patricia Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conversations between hospice volunteers and patients provide patients with emotional and social support, and they are meaningful and satisfying to volunteers. Through questionnaires and interviews, hospice volunteers were asked to describe a meaningful conversation with a patient. Many volunteers stated that all conversations were meaningful. Most, however, were able to describe one specific conversation, though they noted that meaningful conversations cannot be forced and often arise after many interactions. Prominent themes were the meaning of life, experiences and life stories, talk about death and spirituality, discussions of families and relationships, and shared interests. Volunteers expressed appreciation for the opportunity to learn about patients' lives and to gain life lessons. They also indicated the need to listen and respond without judgment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-486
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospices
Volunteers
Spirituality
Family Relations
Life Change Events
Social Support
Interviews

Keywords

  • conversation
  • death
  • end of life
  • hospice
  • palliative care
  • volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spiritual feasts : Meaningful conversations between hospice volunteers and patients. / Planalp, Sally; Trost, Melanie R.; Berry, Patricia.

In: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 7, 11.2011, p. 483-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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