Specifying tissue optical properties using axial dependence of confocal reflectance images: Confocal scanning laser microscopy and optical coherence tomography

S. Jacques, R. Samatham, N. Choudhury, D. S. Gareau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The optical properties of a tissue can be specified by the depth dependence of a reflectance-mode confocal measurement, as the focus is scanned down into a tissue. Reflectance-mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) and optical coherence tomography in focus tracking mode (OCT) are two examples of such confocal measurements. The measurement of reflected signal as a function of the depth of focus, R(z), is expressed as ρe-μz, where ρ [dimensionless] is the local reflectivity from the focus within a tissue and μ [cm-1] is the attenuation of signal as a function of z. The reflectivity of a mirror defines ρ = 1. This paper describes how the experimental ρ and μ map into the optical properties of scattering coefficient, μs [cm-1], and anisotropy of scattering, g [dimensionless]. Preliminary results on tissue for the rCSLM and OCT systems are reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Applications of Light Scattering
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2007
EventBiomedical Applications of Light Scattering - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 20 2007Jan 23 2007

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6446
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherBiomedical Applications of Light Scattering
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/20/071/23/07

Keywords

  • Confocal microscopy
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Optical properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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