Should the definition of preeclampsia include a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg to a level

R. J. Levine, M. G. Ewell, J. C. Hauth, L. B. Curet, P. M. Catalano, Cynthia Morris, G. Choudhary, B. M. Sibai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was undertaken to compare baseline characteristics and pregnancy outcomes between normotensive women who did and those who did not have a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg in association with proteinuria. Study Design: We studied 4302 healthy nulliparous women from the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention trial who were delivered at ≥20 weeks' gestation. We selected as the study group normotensive women who developed proteinuria within 7 days of a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg with respect to baseline on 2 occasions 4 to 168 hours apart. Baseline blood pressure was the mean of measurements at 2 clinic visits before 22 weeks' gestation. Other normotensive women used for comparison were those who did not develop gestational hypertension or a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg in association with proteinuria. Results: Except for greater weight (P <.001), body mass index (P <.001), and systolic blood pressure (P = .05) the baseline characteristics of the 82 women with a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg in association with proteinuria did not differ significantly from those of the other normotensive women. Although they had a greater rate of weight gain (P <.005), larger babies (P = .06), and a 2-fold increase in abdominal delivery (P <.001), there was little other evidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes among these women. Conclusion: During normotensive pregnancy a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg in association with proteinuria appears to be benign and is not a useful clinical construct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-792
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume183
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Pre-Eclampsia
Blood Pressure
Proteinuria
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Ambulatory Care
Cesarean Section
Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Calcium

Keywords

  • Definition
  • Diastolic blood pressure
  • Normotensive
  • Preeclampsia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Should the definition of preeclampsia include a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg to a level . / Levine, R. J.; Ewell, M. G.; Hauth, J. C.; Curet, L. B.; Catalano, P. M.; Morris, Cynthia; Choudhary, G.; Sibai, B. M.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 183, No. 4, 2000, p. 787-792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, R. J. ; Ewell, M. G. ; Hauth, J. C. ; Curet, L. B. ; Catalano, P. M. ; Morris, Cynthia ; Choudhary, G. ; Sibai, B. M. / Should the definition of preeclampsia include a rise in diastolic blood pressure of ≥15 mm Hg to a level . In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2000 ; Vol. 183, No. 4. pp. 787-792.
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AU - Ewell, M. G.

AU - Hauth, J. C.

AU - Curet, L. B.

AU - Catalano, P. M.

AU - Morris, Cynthia

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