Self-efficacy as a predictor of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease

Corina Thomet, Philip Moons, Markus Schwerzmann, Silke Apers, Koen Luyckx, Erwin N. Oechslin, Adrienne Kovacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Self-efficacy is a known predictor of patient-reported outcomes in individuals with acquired diseases. With an overall objective of better understanding patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease, this study aimed to: (i) assess self-efficacy in adults with congenital heart disease, (ii) explore potential demographic and medical correlates of self-efficacy and (iii) determine whether self-efficacy explains additional variance in patient-reported outcomes above and beyond known predictors. Methods: As part of a large cross-sectional international multi-site study (APPROACH-IS), we enrolled 454 adults (median age 32 years, range: 18–81) with congenital heart disease in two tertiary care centres in Canada and Switzerland. Self-efficacy was measured using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) scale, which produces a total score ranging from 10 to 40. Variance in the following patient-reported outcomes was assessed: perceived health status, psychological functioning, health behaviours and quality of life. Hierarchical multivariable linear regression analysis was performed. Results: Patients’ mean GSE score was 30.1 ± 3.3 (range: 10–40). Lower GSE was associated with female sex (p = 0.025), not having a job (p = 0.001) and poorer functional class (p = 0.048). GSE positively predicted health status and quality of life, and negatively predicted symptoms of anxiety and depression, with an additional explained variance up to 13.6%. No associations between self-efficacy and health behaviours were found. Conclusions: GSE adds considerably to our understanding of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. Given that self-efficacy is a modifiable psychosocial factor, it may be an important focus for interventions targeting congenital heart disease patients’ well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-626
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Heart Diseases
Health Behavior
Health Status
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Quality of Life
Psychology
Switzerland
Tertiary Care Centers
Canada
Linear Models
Anxiety
Regression Analysis
Demography
Depression

Keywords

  • congenital
  • heart defects
  • multicentre study
  • patient-reported outcomes
  • Self efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medical–Surgical
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Self-efficacy as a predictor of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. / Thomet, Corina; Moons, Philip; Schwerzmann, Markus; Apers, Silke; Luyckx, Koen; Oechslin, Erwin N.; Kovacs, Adrienne.

In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 17, No. 7, 01.10.2018, p. 619-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomet, Corina ; Moons, Philip ; Schwerzmann, Markus ; Apers, Silke ; Luyckx, Koen ; Oechslin, Erwin N. ; Kovacs, Adrienne. / Self-efficacy as a predictor of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 17, No. 7. pp. 619-626.
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