Self-care autonomy and outcomes of intensive therapy or usual care in youth with type 1 diabetes

Tim Wysocki, Michael Harris, Lisa M. Buckloh, Karen Wilkinson, Michelle Sadler, Nelly Mauras, Neil H. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article evaluated whether deviation from developmentally appropriate self-care autonomy moderated the effects of intensive therapy (IT) or usual care (UC) on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in 142 youths with diabetes. Methods: Youths received an autonomy/maturity ratio (AMR) score at baseline that was a ratio of standardized scores on measures of self-care autonomy to standardized scores on measures of psychological maturity and were categorized by tertile split into low, moderate, and high AMR. Results: Higher baseline AMR was associated with higher baseline HbA1C for IT and UC. Baseline AMR scores predicted glycemic outcomes from UC; the high AMR tertile showed deteriorating glycemic control over time, whereas the low AMR tertile maintained better glycemic control. All three AMR groups derived equal glycemic benefit from IT. Conclusion: Children with inordinate diabetes self-care autonomy may fare poorly in UC but these same children may realize less glycemic deterioration during IT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1036-1045
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Self Care
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Therapeutics
Child Care
Psychology

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Intensive therapy
  • Type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Self-care autonomy and outcomes of intensive therapy or usual care in youth with type 1 diabetes. / Wysocki, Tim; Harris, Michael; Buckloh, Lisa M.; Wilkinson, Karen; Sadler, Michelle; Mauras, Nelly; White, Neil H.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 10, 11.2006, p. 1036-1045.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wysocki, Tim ; Harris, Michael ; Buckloh, Lisa M. ; Wilkinson, Karen ; Sadler, Michelle ; Mauras, Nelly ; White, Neil H. / Self-care autonomy and outcomes of intensive therapy or usual care in youth with type 1 diabetes. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1036-1045.
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