Screening for HIV in pregnant women

Systematic review to update the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation

Roger Chou, Amy Cantor, Bernadette Zakher, Christina Bougatsos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) review found good evidence that prenatal HIV screening is accurate and can lead to interventions that reduce the risk for mother-tochild transmission. Purpose: To update the 2005 USPSTF review, focusing on previously identified research gaps and new evidence on treatments. Data Sources: MEDLINE (2004 to June 2012) and the Cochrane Library (2005 to the second quarter of 2012). Study Selection: Randomized trials and cohort studies of pregnant women on risk for mother-to-child transmission or harms associated with prenatal HIV screening or antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy. Data Extraction: 2 reviewers abstracted and confirmed study details and quality by using predefined criteria. Data Synthesis: No studies directly evaluated effects of prenatal HIV screening on risk for mother-to-child transmission or maternal or infant clinical outcomes. One fair-quality, large cohort study (HIV prevalence, 0.7%) found that rapid testing during labor was associated with a positive predictive value of 90%. New cohort studies of nonbreastfeeding women in the United States and Europe confirm that full-course combination antiretroviral therapy reduces rates of mother-to-child transmission (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-728
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume157
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 20 2012

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Advisory Committees
Pregnant Women
Mothers
HIV
Prenatal Diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Information Storage and Retrieval
MEDLINE
Libraries
Therapeutics
Pregnancy
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Screening for HIV in pregnant women : Systematic review to update the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. / Chou, Roger; Cantor, Amy; Zakher, Bernadette; Bougatsos, Christina.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 157, No. 10, 20.11.2012, p. 719-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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