Salivary protein glycosylation as a noninvasive biomarker for assessment of glycemia

Paturi V. Rao, Amber Laurie, Eric S. Bean, Charles Roberts, Srinivasa R. Nagalla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Assessment of short-term glycemic control can facilitate monitoring of diabetes development in at-risk individuals and monitoring response to lifestyle modification or medication. We evaluated salivary protein glycosylation levels as a novel, noninvasive, short-term glycemic index in comparison to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fructosamine, 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods: Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes were monitored by CGM and saliva and blood were collected at baseline and days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 for determination of salivary protein glycosylation, serum fructosamine, and serum 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) levels, as well as HbA1c (baseline and day 28). Weekly, 14-day, 21-day, and 28-day summary blood glucose measures from CGM were computed and matched to the time of each study visit. Results: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a moderate correlation with fructosamine (r = .65) and 1,5-AG (r = -.48) at baseline, and weak correlation with HbA1c (r = .3). Conclusions: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a stronger correlation than fructosamine and 1,5-AG with 7-, 14-, and 21-day average BG (r = .84, .84, and .69, respectively, vs -.37, -.28, and .00 [fructosamine] and .00, -.21, and -.57 [1,5-AG]), maximum BG (r = .79, .76, and .53 vs -.09, -.21, and -.05 [fructosamine] and -.32, -.27, and -.52 [1,5-AG]), and percentage of time over 140 mg/dL (r = .87, .79, and .59 vs -.26, -.32, and .07 [fructosamine] and -.04, -.10, and -.50 [1,5-AG]). Salivary protein glycosylation represents a promising noninvasive technology for monitoring short-term glycemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of diabetes science and technology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salivary Proteins and Peptides
Fructosamine
Glycosylation
Biomarkers
Proteins
Glucose
Monitoring
Hemoglobin
Hemoglobins
Medical problems
Blood
Glycemic Index
1,5-anhydroglucitol
Serum
Saliva
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Life Style
Technology

Keywords

  • continuous glucose monitoring
  • fructosamine
  • glycosylation
  • hemoglobin A1c
  • saliva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Salivary protein glycosylation as a noninvasive biomarker for assessment of glycemia. / Rao, Paturi V.; Laurie, Amber; Bean, Eric S.; Roberts, Charles; Nagalla, Srinivasa R.

In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 97-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rao, Paturi V. ; Laurie, Amber ; Bean, Eric S. ; Roberts, Charles ; Nagalla, Srinivasa R. / Salivary protein glycosylation as a noninvasive biomarker for assessment of glycemia. In: Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 97-104.
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AU - Roberts, Charles

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N2 - Background: Assessment of short-term glycemic control can facilitate monitoring of diabetes development in at-risk individuals and monitoring response to lifestyle modification or medication. We evaluated salivary protein glycosylation levels as a novel, noninvasive, short-term glycemic index in comparison to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fructosamine, 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods: Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes were monitored by CGM and saliva and blood were collected at baseline and days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 for determination of salivary protein glycosylation, serum fructosamine, and serum 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) levels, as well as HbA1c (baseline and day 28). Weekly, 14-day, 21-day, and 28-day summary blood glucose measures from CGM were computed and matched to the time of each study visit. Results: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a moderate correlation with fructosamine (r = .65) and 1,5-AG (r = -.48) at baseline, and weak correlation with HbA1c (r = .3). Conclusions: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a stronger correlation than fructosamine and 1,5-AG with 7-, 14-, and 21-day average BG (r = .84, .84, and .69, respectively, vs -.37, -.28, and .00 [fructosamine] and .00, -.21, and -.57 [1,5-AG]), maximum BG (r = .79, .76, and .53 vs -.09, -.21, and -.05 [fructosamine] and -.32, -.27, and -.52 [1,5-AG]), and percentage of time over 140 mg/dL (r = .87, .79, and .59 vs -.26, -.32, and .07 [fructosamine] and -.04, -.10, and -.50 [1,5-AG]). Salivary protein glycosylation represents a promising noninvasive technology for monitoring short-term glycemic control.

AB - Background: Assessment of short-term glycemic control can facilitate monitoring of diabetes development in at-risk individuals and monitoring response to lifestyle modification or medication. We evaluated salivary protein glycosylation levels as a novel, noninvasive, short-term glycemic index in comparison to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fructosamine, 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods: Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes were monitored by CGM and saliva and blood were collected at baseline and days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 for determination of salivary protein glycosylation, serum fructosamine, and serum 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) levels, as well as HbA1c (baseline and day 28). Weekly, 14-day, 21-day, and 28-day summary blood glucose measures from CGM were computed and matched to the time of each study visit. Results: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a moderate correlation with fructosamine (r = .65) and 1,5-AG (r = -.48) at baseline, and weak correlation with HbA1c (r = .3). Conclusions: Salivary protein glycosylation exhibited a stronger correlation than fructosamine and 1,5-AG with 7-, 14-, and 21-day average BG (r = .84, .84, and .69, respectively, vs -.37, -.28, and .00 [fructosamine] and .00, -.21, and -.57 [1,5-AG]), maximum BG (r = .79, .76, and .53 vs -.09, -.21, and -.05 [fructosamine] and -.32, -.27, and -.52 [1,5-AG]), and percentage of time over 140 mg/dL (r = .87, .79, and .59 vs -.26, -.32, and .07 [fructosamine] and -.04, -.10, and -.50 [1,5-AG]). Salivary protein glycosylation represents a promising noninvasive technology for monitoring short-term glycemic control.

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