Rural Oregon community perspectives

Introducing community-based participatory research into a community health coalition

Julia Young-Lorion, Melinda Davis, Nancy Kirks, Anna Hsu, Jana Kay Slater, Nancy Rollins, Susan Aromaa, Paul McGinnis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Community Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP) model has supported community health development in more than 100 communities nationally. In 2011, four rural Oregon CHIPs collaborated with investigators from the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN), a component of the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), to obtain training on research methods, develop and implement pilot research studies on childhood obesity, and explore matches with academic partners. This article summarizes the experiences of the Lincoln County CHIP, established in 2003, as it transitioned from CHIP to Community Health Improvement and Research Partnership (CHIRP). Our story and lessons learned may inform rural community-based health coalitions and academicians who are engaged in or considering Communitybased participatory research (CBPR) partnerships. Utilizing existing infrastructure and relationships in community and academic settings provides an ideal starting point for rural, bidirectional research partnerships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-322
Number of pages10
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Rural Population
rural community
coalition
Health
health
Research
community
Social Planning
Translational Medical Research
Pediatric Obesity
research facility
research method
Research Personnel
childhood
infrastructure

Keywords

  • Child
  • Community health partnerships
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Obesity
  • Rural health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Rural Oregon community perspectives : Introducing community-based participatory research into a community health coalition. / Young-Lorion, Julia; Davis, Melinda; Kirks, Nancy; Hsu, Anna; Slater, Jana Kay; Rollins, Nancy; Aromaa, Susan; McGinnis, Paul.

In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2013, p. 313-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young-Lorion, Julia ; Davis, Melinda ; Kirks, Nancy ; Hsu, Anna ; Slater, Jana Kay ; Rollins, Nancy ; Aromaa, Susan ; McGinnis, Paul. / Rural Oregon community perspectives : Introducing community-based participatory research into a community health coalition. In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 313-322.
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