Rosiglitazone improves insulin sensitivity and baroreflex gain in rats with diet-induced obesity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P ± 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P <0.05), which were well correlated (r2 = 0.49; P <0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P <0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg ·min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r2 = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P <0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-213
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume343
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

rosiglitazone
Baroreflex
Insulin Resistance
Obesity
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

@article{106897e67b5a4dca949fe6c7691182ba,
title = "Rosiglitazone improves insulin sensitivity and baroreflex gain in rats with diet-induced obesity",
abstract = "Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P ± 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P <0.05), which were well correlated (r2 = 0.49; P <0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P <0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg ·min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r2 = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P <0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.",
author = "Ding Zhao and Belinda McCully and Virginia Brooks",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1124/jpet.112.194738",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "343",
pages = "206--213",
journal = "Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics",
issn = "0022-3565",
publisher = "American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rosiglitazone improves insulin sensitivity and baroreflex gain in rats with diet-induced obesity

AU - Zhao, Ding

AU - McCully, Belinda

AU - Brooks, Virginia

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P ± 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P <0.05), which were well correlated (r2 = 0.49; P <0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P <0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg ·min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r2 = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P <0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.

AB - Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P ± 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P <0.05), which were well correlated (r2 = 0.49; P <0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P <0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg ·min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r2 = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P <0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866325097&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866325097&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1124/jpet.112.194738

DO - 10.1124/jpet.112.194738

M3 - Article

VL - 343

SP - 206

EP - 213

JO - Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

JF - Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

SN - 0022-3565

IS - 1

ER -