Relationship between physical disabilities or long-term health problems and health risk behaviors or conditions among US high school students

Sherry Everett Jones, Donald Lollar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background This study explores the relationship between self-reported physical disabilities or long-term health problems and health risk behaviors or adverse health conditions (self-reported engagement in violent behaviors, attempted suicide, cigarette smoking, alcohol and other drug use, sexual activity, physical activity, dietary behaviors, self-reported overweight [based on height and weight], physical health, and mental health) among US high school students. Methods Data were from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a cross-sectional paper-and-pencil survey collected from a representative sample of public and private high school students (grades 9 through 12) in the United States. Results Significantly more students with physical disabilities or long-term health problems than without described their health as fair or poor and reported being in a physical fight, being forced to have sexual intercourse, feeling sad or hopeless, seriously considering and attempting suicide, cigarette smoking, using alcohol and marijuana, engaging in sexual activity, using computers 3 or more hours per day, and being overweight (for all, p ≤.05). For none of the health risk behaviors analyzed were the rates significantly lower among students with physical disabilities or long-term health problems than among other students. Conclusions Young people who live with physical disabilities or long-term health problems may be at greater risk for poor health outcomes. Public health and school health programs, with guidance from health care providers, need to work with these adolescents and their families to develop and implement appropriate interventions, with particular emphasis on promoting mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-257
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume78
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

physical disability
Risk-Taking
health risk
health behavior
risk behavior
Students
Health
health
school
student
Sexual Behavior
suicide
smoking
Mental Health
Smoking
mental health
alcohol
Health Fairs
Alcohols
Public Health Schools

Keywords

  • Child and adolescent health
  • Children with disabilities
  • Risk behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Relationship between physical disabilities or long-term health problems and health risk behaviors or conditions among US high school students. / Jones, Sherry Everett; Lollar, Donald.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 252-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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