Reducing Roentgenography Use: Can Patient Expectations Be Altered?

Richard (Rick) Deyo, Andrew K. Diehl, Marc Rosenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many roentgenographic tests, including lumbar spine roentgenograms, may be overutilized. We examined the psychological, functional, and financial consequences of omitting spine films for patients with back pain with little risk of underlying systemic illness. Patients were randomized to receive immediate roentgenograms (n = 49) or a brief educational intervention, with roentgenography only for failure to improve (n = 52). After three weeks, 73% of the roentgenography group believed “everyone with back pain should have an x-ray,” vs 44% of the education group. After three months, although 31% in the education group had received roentgenograms, overall radiology charges were still far less than those of the roentgenography group. No serious diagnoses were missed, and symptom resolution, functional improvement, and satisfaction were similar for the two groups. Thus, eliminating or delaying spine films need not cause anxiety, dissatisfaction, or dysfunction. This strategy may modify future expectations of roentgenography use and reduce health care costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-145
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume147
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Radiography
Spine
Motion Pictures
Back Pain
Education
Radiology
Health Care Costs
Anxiety
X-Rays
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Reducing Roentgenography Use : Can Patient Expectations Be Altered? / Deyo, Richard (Rick); Diehl, Andrew K.; Rosenthal, Marc.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 147, No. 1, 1987, p. 141-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deyo, Richard (Rick) ; Diehl, Andrew K. ; Rosenthal, Marc. / Reducing Roentgenography Use : Can Patient Expectations Be Altered?. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1987 ; Vol. 147, No. 1. pp. 141-145.
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