Reducing risk for mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C virus: A systematic review for the U.S. preventive services task force

Erika Barth Cottrell, Roger Chou, Ngoc Wasson, Basmah Rahman, Jeanne Marie Guise

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Mother-to-infant transmission is the leading cause of childhood hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, with up to 4000 new cases each year in the United States. Purpose: To evaluate effects of mode of delivery, labor management strategies, and breastfeeding practices on risk for mother-toinfant transmission of HCV. Data Sources: MEDLINE (1947 to May 2012), the Cochrane Library Database, clinical trial registries, and reference lists. Study Selection: Randomized trials and observational studies on mode of delivery, labor management strategies, and breastfeeding practices and risk for mother-to-infant transmission of HCV. Data Extraction: Investigators abstracted and reviewed study details and quality using predefined criteria. Data Synthesis: Eighteen observational studies evaluated the association between mode of delivery, labor management strategies, or breastfeeding practices and risk for mother-to-infant HCV transmission. Fourteen studies (2 good-quality, 4 fair-quality, and 8 poorquality studies) found no clear association between mode of delivery (vaginal versus cesarean delivery) and risk for transmission. Two studies (1 good-quality and 1 poor-quality study) reported an association between prolonged duration of ruptured membranes and increased risk for transmission. Fourteen studies (2 good-quality, 2 fair-quality, and 10 poor-quality studies) found no association between breastfeeding and risk for transmission. Limitations: Only English-language articles were included. Studies were observational, and most had important methodological shortcomings, including failure to adjust for potential confounders and small sample sizes. Conclusion: No intervention has been clearly demonstrated to reduce the risk for mother-to-infant HCV transmission. Avoidance of breastfeeding does not seem to be indicated for reducing transmission risk. Primary Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-113
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of internal medicine
Volume158
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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