Radiation enhances the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and improves chemo-radiation efficacy in brain tumor xenografts

Prakash Ambady, Yingjen Jeffrey Wu, Cymon N. Kersch, Joshua M. Walker, Samantha Holland, Leslie L. Muldoon, Edward A. Neuwelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Overexpression of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) contributes to resistance to chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) in brain tumors. We previously demonstrated that non-ablative radiation improved delivery of anti-MGMT morpholino oligonucleotides (AMONs) to reduce MGMT levels in subcutaneous tumor xenografts. We evaluate this approach to enhance CRT efficacy in rat brain tumor xenograft models. The impact of radiation on targeted delivery was evaluated using fluorescent oligonucleotides (f-ON). In vitro, f-ON was localized to clathrin-coated vesicles, endosomes, and lysosomes using confocal microscopy in T98G glioma cells. In vivo, fluorescence was detected in pre-radiated, but not non-radiated Long Evans (non-tumor bearing) rat brains. Cranial radiation (2 Gy) followed by AMONs (intravenous, 10.5 mg/kg) reduced MGMT expression by 50% in both orthotopic cerebellar D283 medulloblastoma and intracerebral H460 non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) xenograft models. To evaluate the efficacy, AMONs concurrent with CRT (2 Gy radiation plus oral 20 mg/kg temozolomide ×4 days) reduced tumor volumes in the medulloblastoma model (p = 0.012), and a similar trend was found in the NSCLC brain metastasis model. We provide proof of concept for the use of non-ablative radiation to guide and enhance the delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides into brain tumor xenograft models to reduce MGMT levels and improve CRT efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Gene Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

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