Quick analysis of optical spectra to quantify epidermal melanin and papillary dermal blood content of skin

Steven Jacques

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a practical approach for assessing the melanin and blood content of the skin from total diffuse reflectance spectra, R(λ), where λ is wavelength. A quick spectral analysis using just three wavelengths (585 nm, 700 nm and 800 nm) is presented, based on the 1985 work of Kollias and Baquer who documented epidermal melanin of skin using the slope of optical density (OD) between 620 nm and 720 nm. The paper describes the non-rectilinear character of such a quick analysis, and shows that almost any choice of two wavelengths in the 600-900 range can achieve the characterization of melanin. The extrapolation of the melanin slope to 585 nm serves as a baseline for subtraction from the OD (585 nm) to yield a blood perfusion score. Monte Carlo simulations created spectral data for a skin model with epidermis, papillary dermis and reticular dermis to illustrate the analysis. A practical approach for assessing the melanin and blood content of the skin from total diffuse reflectance spectra is presented. The paper describes the non-rectilinear character of a quick analysis, which uses just three wavelengths, and shows that most any choice of two wavelengths in the 600-900 range can achieve the characterization of melanin. Monte Carlo simulations created spectral data for a skin model with epidermis, papillary dermis and reticular dermis to illustrate the analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-316
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biophotonics
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Melanin
  • Skin
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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