Quality of life in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and sleep dysfunction undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery

A pilot investigation of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea

Jeremiah A. Alt, Adam S. DeConde, Jess C. Mace, Toby Steele, Richard R. Orlandi, Timothy Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have reduced sleep quality linked to their overall well-being and disease-specific quality of life (QOL). Other primary sleep disorders also affect QOL. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on CRS disease-specific QOL and sleep dysfunction in patients with CRS following functional endoscopic sinus surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective multisite cohort study conducted between October 2011 and November 2014 at academic, tertiary referral centers with a population-based sample of 405 adults. INTERVENTION: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery for medically refractory symptoms of CRS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcome measures consisted of preoperative and postoperative scores operationalized by the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) survey, the 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Obstructive sleep apnea was the primary, independent risk factor. RESULTS: Of 405 participants, 60 (15%) had comorbid OSA. A total of 285 (70%) participants provided preoperative and postoperative survey responses, with a mean (SD) of 13.7 (5.3) months of follow-up. Significant postoperative improvement (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-881
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume141
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Tertiary Care Centers
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Quality of life in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and sleep dysfunction undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery : A pilot investigation of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea. / Alt, Jeremiah A.; DeConde, Adam S.; Mace, Jess C.; Steele, Toby; Orlandi, Richard R.; Smith, Timothy.

In: JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 141, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 873-881.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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