Pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal young subjects

Assessment by deconvolution analysis

Mary Samuels, J. Veldhuis, C. Cawley, R. J. Urban, M. Luther, R. Bauer, G. Mundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preliminary reports suggest that PTH is secreted in a pulsatile fashion. However, available studies have not attempted to calculate actual PTH secretion rates in healthy individuals. To accurately characterize PTH secretory dynamics in healthy subjects, we studied seven young women and six young men, all of whom had hip and spine bone densities by dual photon densitometry in the upper tertile for age-matched control subjects. PTH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay in blood sampled every 2 min over 6 h. Ionized calcium levels were obtained during the second and third hours of the study. Plasma PTH profiles were subjected to deconvolution analysis, which resolves measured hormone levels into secretion and clearance components. Cross-correlation analysis was performed to assess direct or inverse correlations between serum PTH and ionized calcium concentrations at various time lags. In these subjects, PTH was secreted in a dual fashion, with significant basal (tonic) secretion and PTH pulses approximately every 20 min. Pulsatile PTH secretion accounted for approximately 25% of the total secreted PTH. There were no differences in PTH secretory parameters between men and women, nor were there any significant correlations between PTH and ionized calcium concentrations. We conclude that in normal subjects, the predominant mode of PTH secretion is tonic, with superimposed PTH pulses of small amplitude but high frequency. The clinical significance of this complex physiological pattern of secretion awaits further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-403
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume77
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1993

Fingerprint

Deconvolution
Parathyroid Hormone
Calcium
Pelvic Bones
Immunoradiometric Assay
Densitometry
Photons
Bone Density
Assays
Healthy Volunteers
Bone
Spine
Blood
Hormones
Plasmas
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal young subjects : Assessment by deconvolution analysis. / Samuels, Mary; Veldhuis, J.; Cawley, C.; Urban, R. J.; Luther, M.; Bauer, R.; Mundy, G.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 77, No. 2, 08.1993, p. 399-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Samuels, Mary ; Veldhuis, J. ; Cawley, C. ; Urban, R. J. ; Luther, M. ; Bauer, R. ; Mundy, G. / Pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal young subjects : Assessment by deconvolution analysis. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1993 ; Vol. 77, No. 2. pp. 399-403.
@article{261380722dc54516ac80ee53fffc1f38,
title = "Pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal young subjects: Assessment by deconvolution analysis",
abstract = "Preliminary reports suggest that PTH is secreted in a pulsatile fashion. However, available studies have not attempted to calculate actual PTH secretion rates in healthy individuals. To accurately characterize PTH secretory dynamics in healthy subjects, we studied seven young women and six young men, all of whom had hip and spine bone densities by dual photon densitometry in the upper tertile for age-matched control subjects. PTH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay in blood sampled every 2 min over 6 h. Ionized calcium levels were obtained during the second and third hours of the study. Plasma PTH profiles were subjected to deconvolution analysis, which resolves measured hormone levels into secretion and clearance components. Cross-correlation analysis was performed to assess direct or inverse correlations between serum PTH and ionized calcium concentrations at various time lags. In these subjects, PTH was secreted in a dual fashion, with significant basal (tonic) secretion and PTH pulses approximately every 20 min. Pulsatile PTH secretion accounted for approximately 25{\%} of the total secreted PTH. There were no differences in PTH secretory parameters between men and women, nor were there any significant correlations between PTH and ionized calcium concentrations. We conclude that in normal subjects, the predominant mode of PTH secretion is tonic, with superimposed PTH pulses of small amplitude but high frequency. The clinical significance of this complex physiological pattern of secretion awaits further study.",
author = "Mary Samuels and J. Veldhuis and C. Cawley and Urban, {R. J.} and M. Luther and R. Bauer and G. Mundy",
year = "1993",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "77",
pages = "399--403",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal young subjects

T2 - Assessment by deconvolution analysis

AU - Samuels, Mary

AU - Veldhuis, J.

AU - Cawley, C.

AU - Urban, R. J.

AU - Luther, M.

AU - Bauer, R.

AU - Mundy, G.

PY - 1993/8

Y1 - 1993/8

N2 - Preliminary reports suggest that PTH is secreted in a pulsatile fashion. However, available studies have not attempted to calculate actual PTH secretion rates in healthy individuals. To accurately characterize PTH secretory dynamics in healthy subjects, we studied seven young women and six young men, all of whom had hip and spine bone densities by dual photon densitometry in the upper tertile for age-matched control subjects. PTH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay in blood sampled every 2 min over 6 h. Ionized calcium levels were obtained during the second and third hours of the study. Plasma PTH profiles were subjected to deconvolution analysis, which resolves measured hormone levels into secretion and clearance components. Cross-correlation analysis was performed to assess direct or inverse correlations between serum PTH and ionized calcium concentrations at various time lags. In these subjects, PTH was secreted in a dual fashion, with significant basal (tonic) secretion and PTH pulses approximately every 20 min. Pulsatile PTH secretion accounted for approximately 25% of the total secreted PTH. There were no differences in PTH secretory parameters between men and women, nor were there any significant correlations between PTH and ionized calcium concentrations. We conclude that in normal subjects, the predominant mode of PTH secretion is tonic, with superimposed PTH pulses of small amplitude but high frequency. The clinical significance of this complex physiological pattern of secretion awaits further study.

AB - Preliminary reports suggest that PTH is secreted in a pulsatile fashion. However, available studies have not attempted to calculate actual PTH secretion rates in healthy individuals. To accurately characterize PTH secretory dynamics in healthy subjects, we studied seven young women and six young men, all of whom had hip and spine bone densities by dual photon densitometry in the upper tertile for age-matched control subjects. PTH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay in blood sampled every 2 min over 6 h. Ionized calcium levels were obtained during the second and third hours of the study. Plasma PTH profiles were subjected to deconvolution analysis, which resolves measured hormone levels into secretion and clearance components. Cross-correlation analysis was performed to assess direct or inverse correlations between serum PTH and ionized calcium concentrations at various time lags. In these subjects, PTH was secreted in a dual fashion, with significant basal (tonic) secretion and PTH pulses approximately every 20 min. Pulsatile PTH secretion accounted for approximately 25% of the total secreted PTH. There were no differences in PTH secretory parameters between men and women, nor were there any significant correlations between PTH and ionized calcium concentrations. We conclude that in normal subjects, the predominant mode of PTH secretion is tonic, with superimposed PTH pulses of small amplitude but high frequency. The clinical significance of this complex physiological pattern of secretion awaits further study.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027328389&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027328389&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 399

EP - 403

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 2

ER -