Prostate cancer mortality rates compared to urologist population densities and prostate-specific antigen screening levels on a state-by-state basis in the United States of America

J. L. Colli, Christopher Amling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We hypothesized that prostate cancer screening and availability of urologists among states may be associated with reduced prostate cancer mortality in the United States. To test this hypothesis, state-specific prostate cancer mortality rates for white males were compared to urologist population densities and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening rates on a state-by-state basis. The urologist population density was calculated by dividing the number of urologists per state by the population. We found that prostate cancer mortality rates correlated inversely with urologist population densities (P <0.01) and PSA screening (P <0.01) suggesting that screening and treatment reduce prostate cancer mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-251
Number of pages5
JournalProstate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
Population Density
Prostatic Neoplasms
Mortality
Early Detection of Cancer
Urologists
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

Cite this

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title = "Prostate cancer mortality rates compared to urologist population densities and prostate-specific antigen screening levels on a state-by-state basis in the United States of America",
abstract = "We hypothesized that prostate cancer screening and availability of urologists among states may be associated with reduced prostate cancer mortality in the United States. To test this hypothesis, state-specific prostate cancer mortality rates for white males were compared to urologist population densities and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening rates on a state-by-state basis. The urologist population density was calculated by dividing the number of urologists per state by the population. We found that prostate cancer mortality rates correlated inversely with urologist population densities (P <0.01) and PSA screening (P <0.01) suggesting that screening and treatment reduce prostate cancer mortality.",
author = "Colli, {J. L.} and Christopher Amling",
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AB - We hypothesized that prostate cancer screening and availability of urologists among states may be associated with reduced prostate cancer mortality in the United States. To test this hypothesis, state-specific prostate cancer mortality rates for white males were compared to urologist population densities and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening rates on a state-by-state basis. The urologist population density was calculated by dividing the number of urologists per state by the population. We found that prostate cancer mortality rates correlated inversely with urologist population densities (P <0.01) and PSA screening (P <0.01) suggesting that screening and treatment reduce prostate cancer mortality.

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