Prophylactic rotation for malposition in the second stage of labor: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Julia Burd, Julie Gomez, Vincenzo Berghella, Federica Bellussi, Bradley de Vries, Hala Phipps, Julie Blanc, Jeffrey Broberg, Aaron B. Caughey, Caroline Verhaeghe, Johanna Quist-Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate if manual rotation, undertaken during labor, of fetuses in occiput posterior or occiput transverse position led to an increased rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery. DATA SOURCES: Searches were performed in MEDLINE, Ovid, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with the use of a combination of keywords and text words related to “occiput posterior,” “occiput transverse,” and “manual rotation” from inception of the databases to July 2021. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: We included all randomized controlled trials evaluating manual rotation of fetuses in the occiput posterior or occiput transverse position during labor. METHODS: The primary outcome was the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery. Meta-analyses were performed using the random effects model of DerSimonian and Laird to determine the relative risks or mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: A total of 643 records were screened with inclusion of 6 articles and 1002 randomized patients. All included studies compared manual rotation of fetuses in occiput posterior or occiput transverse position, all confirmed using ultrasound examinations, after complete cervical dilation with either no rotation or a sham rotation procedure. There was no difference in the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery with manual rotation (relative risk, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.95–1.20) nor was there any difference in any other maternal or fetal outcomes. In a subgroup analysis of occiput posterior fetuses, there was a 12.80-minute decrease in the length of the second stage of labor in the manual rotation group (mean difference, −12.80; 95% confidence interval, −22.61 to −2.99). There were no significant differences in any other maternal or fetal outcomes in the occiput posterior subgroup and no differences in the occiput transverse subgroup. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic manual rotation of fetuses in occiput posterior or occiput transverse position, confirmed using ultrasound examination, did not increase the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery compared with no manual rotation. Manual rotation of the occiput posterior fetal head early during the second stage of labor was associated with a significant 12.8-minute decrease in the length of the second stage of labor with no changes in any other maternal or fetal outcomes. There were no differences demonstrated for fetuses rotated from occiput transverse position or for the combination of occiput posterior and occiput transverse fetuses. Because there is some evidence of benefit, prophylactic manual rotation can be offered to patients during the second stage of labor presenting with occiput posterior position of the fetal head documented during ultrasound examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100554
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics & gynecology MFM
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cesarean delivery
  • digital rotation
  • labor
  • malposition
  • manual rotation
  • occiput posterior
  • occiput transverse
  • vaginal delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Medicine(all)

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