Prevalence of complicated gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus among racial groups in a multi-center consortium

Amy Wang, Nora C. Mattek, Jennifer L. Holub, David A. Lieberman, Glenn M. Eisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims The Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database was used to evaluate ethnic trends in complicated reflux disease and suspected Barrett's esophagus among various racial groups. Methods Endoscopic findings for procedures performed January 2000-December 2005 for any indication and for reflux-related indications were reviewed by racial group. Results Of 280,075 procedures examined, Hispanics were the most likely to have esophagitis (Hispanic 19.6%, white 17.3%, black 15.8%, Asian/Pacific Islander 9.5%, P-value < 0.0001), and white subjects were most likely to have suspected BE (white 5.0%, Hispanic 2.9%, Asian/Pacific Islander 1.8%, black 1.5%, P-value < 0.0001). Endoscopies performed for reflux-related indications had similar trends for esophagitis and esophageal stricture. Among reflux/Barrett's screening procedures adjusted for age and gender, Hispanics were most likely to have esophagitis (OR = 1.28, P-value < 0.0001) compared to Caucasians. Conclusion Our results demonstrate an association of suspected Barrett's esophagus and stricture with white patients and esophagitis with Hispanic patients. These findings need to be followed-up with further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)964-971
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive diseases and sciences
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Keywords

  • Barrett's esophagus
  • Esophagitis
  • Minority groups
  • Race
  • Stricture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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