Prevalence, age profile, and associated risk factors for hymenolepis nana infection in a large population-based study in Northern Peru

Percy M.Vilchez Barreto, Ricardo Gamboa, Saul Santivañez, Seth O'Neal, Claudio Muro, Andrés G. Lescano, Luz Maria Moyano, Guillermo Gonzálvez, Hector H. García

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hymenolepis nana, the dwarf tapeworm, is a common intestinal infection of children worldwide. We evaluated infection and risk factor data that were previously collected from 14,761 children aged 2-15 years during a large-scale program in northern Peru. We found that 1,124 of 14,761 children (7.61%) had H. nana infection, a likely underestimate given that only a single stool sample was examined by microscopy for diagnosis. The strongest association with infection was lack of adequate water (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-2.48) and sanitation infrastructure in the house (aPR 1.94, 95% CI 1.64-2.29). One quarter of those tested did not have a bathroom or latrine at home, which doubled their likelihood of infection. Similarly, one quarter did not have piped public water to the house, which also increased the likelihood of infection. Continued efforts to improve access to basic water and sanitation services will likely reduce the burden of infection in children for this and other intestinal infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-586
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Hymenolepiasis
Hymenolepis nana
Peru
Infection
Population
Toilet Facilities
Sanitation
Water
Confidence Intervals
Cestoda
Microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Prevalence, age profile, and associated risk factors for hymenolepis nana infection in a large population-based study in Northern Peru. / Barreto, Percy M.Vilchez; Gamboa, Ricardo; Santivañez, Saul; O'Neal, Seth; Muro, Claudio; Lescano, Andrés G.; Moyano, Luz Maria; Gonzálvez, Guillermo; García, Hector H.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 97, No. 2, 2017, p. 583-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barreto, Percy M.Vilchez ; Gamboa, Ricardo ; Santivañez, Saul ; O'Neal, Seth ; Muro, Claudio ; Lescano, Andrés G. ; Moyano, Luz Maria ; Gonzálvez, Guillermo ; García, Hector H. / Prevalence, age profile, and associated risk factors for hymenolepis nana infection in a large population-based study in Northern Peru. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2017 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 583-586.
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