Preparation of the intensive care patient for major surgery

Bruce M. Wolfe, Peter G. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Improved methods for monitoring and treating critically ill patients have increased the number of surgical candidates with multiorgan system impairment. Whereas such patients may have been considered "too sick to undergo surgery" in the past, many such patients linger in the intensive care unit unless definitive therapy is accomplished. Specific attention to review of the patient's preoperative preparation for surgery on a system-by-system basis may improve outcome substantially. The need for possible mechanical ventilation prior to transport to the operating room must receive particular attention. Pneumothorax, if present, must be treated prior to institution of positive-pressure ventilation so progression to tension pneumothorax can be avoided. Deficits in the circulating blood volume must be identified and corrected preoperatively if possible. A need for enhancement of cardiac output or alteration of vascular tone requires pulmonary arterial catheterization and indicates an increased operative risk. Metabolic abnormalities such as disturbances of acid-base balance, sodium or potassium concentration, and endocrinopathies are identified and corrected as much as possible prior to operation. Antibiotics are instituted as appropriate. Replacement of the red blood cell mass is dictated primarily by anticipated or actual blood loss. Factors of coagulation are infused on a replacement basis as necessary. Great care must be taken during transport to the operating room, as maintenance of intravascular monitoring devices, therapeutic infusions, and mechanical ventilation must continue during transport. Precautions must be taken to avoid hypothermia during transport and institution of anesthesia. Critical illness mandates specific considerations of the anesthetic agents to be utilized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-191
Number of pages8
JournalWorld journal of surgery
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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