Pregnancy risk among black, white, and Hispanic teen girls in New York City public schools

Elizabeth Needham Waddell, Mark G. Orr, Judith Sackoff, John S. Santelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Disparities in teen pregnancy rates are explained by different rates of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Identifying other components of risk such as race/ ethnicity and neighborhood can inform strategies for teen pregnancy prevention. Data from the 2005 and 2007 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were used to model demographic differences in odds of recent sexual activity and birth control use among black, white, and Hispanic public high school girls. Overall pregnancy risk was calculated using pregnancy risk index (PRI) methodology, which estimates probability of pregnancy based on current sexual activity and birth control method at last intercourse. Factors of race/ethnicity, grade level, age, borough, and school neighborhood were assessed. Whites reported lower rates of current sexual activity (23.4%) than blacks (35.4%) or Hispanics (32.7%), and had lower predicted pregnancy risk (PRI= 5.4% vs. 9.0% and 10.5%, respectively). Among sexually active females, hormonal contraception use rates were low in all groups (11.6% among whites, 7.8% among blacks, and 7.5% among Hispanics). Compared to white teens, much of the difference in PRI was attributable to poorer contraceptive use (19% among blacks and 50% among Hispanics). Significant differences in contraceptive use were also observed by school neighborhood after adjusting for age group and race/ethnicity. Interventions to reduce teen pregnancy among diverse populations should include messages promoting delayed sexual activity, condom use and use of highly effective birth control methods. Access to long-acting contraceptive methods must be expanded for all sexually active high school students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-439
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume87
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Contraception
  • Sexual behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Urban Studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pregnancy risk among black, white, and Hispanic teen girls in New York City public schools'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this