Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments

Jennifer L. Wiler, Daniel A. Handel, Adit A. Ginde, Dominik Aronsky, Nicholas G. Genes, Jeffrey L. Hackman, Joshua A. Hilton, Ula Hwang, Michael Kamali, Jesse M. Pines, Emilie Powell, Medhi Sattarian, Rongwei (Rochelle) Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Prolonged emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) is linked to adverse outcomes, decreased patient satisfaction, and ED crowding. This multicenter study identified factors associated with increased LOS. Methods: This retrospective study included 9 EDs from across the United States. Emergency department daily operational metrics were collected from calendar year 2009. A multivariable linear population average model was used with log-transformed LOS as the dependent variable to identify which ED operational variables are predictors of LOS for ED discharged, admitted, and overall ED patient categories. Results: Annual ED census ranged from 43 000 to 101 000 patients. The number of ED treatment beds ranged from 27 to 95. Median overall LOS for all sites was 5.4 hours. Daily percentage of admitted patients was found to be a significant predictor of discharged and admitted patient LOS. Higher daily percentage of discharged and eloped patients, more hours on ambulance diversion, and weekday (vs weekend) of patient presentation were significantly associated with prolonged LOS for discharged and admitted patients (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1860-1864
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Hospital Emergency Service
Length of Stay
Ambulance Diversion
Emergency Treatment
Censuses
Patient Satisfaction
Multicenter Studies
Retrospective Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Wiler, J. L., Handel, D. A., Ginde, A. A., Aronsky, D., Genes, N. G., Hackman, J. L., ... Fu, R. R. (2012). Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 30(9), 1860-1864. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2012.03.028

Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments. / Wiler, Jennifer L.; Handel, Daniel A.; Ginde, Adit A.; Aronsky, Dominik; Genes, Nicholas G.; Hackman, Jeffrey L.; Hilton, Joshua A.; Hwang, Ula; Kamali, Michael; Pines, Jesse M.; Powell, Emilie; Sattarian, Medhi; Fu, Rongwei (Rochelle).

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 9, 11.2012, p. 1860-1864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiler, JL, Handel, DA, Ginde, AA, Aronsky, D, Genes, NG, Hackman, JL, Hilton, JA, Hwang, U, Kamali, M, Pines, JM, Powell, E, Sattarian, M & Fu, RR 2012, 'Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments', American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 30, no. 9, pp. 1860-1864. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2012.03.028
Wiler JL, Handel DA, Ginde AA, Aronsky D, Genes NG, Hackman JL et al. Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments. American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2012 Nov;30(9):1860-1864. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2012.03.028
Wiler, Jennifer L. ; Handel, Daniel A. ; Ginde, Adit A. ; Aronsky, Dominik ; Genes, Nicholas G. ; Hackman, Jeffrey L. ; Hilton, Joshua A. ; Hwang, Ula ; Kamali, Michael ; Pines, Jesse M. ; Powell, Emilie ; Sattarian, Medhi ; Fu, Rongwei (Rochelle). / Predictors of patient length of stay in 9 emergency departments. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 30, No. 9. pp. 1860-1864.
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