Predictors of clinical performance among internal medicine residents

Donald Girard, D. H. Hickam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether personal characteristics influence residents' psychological states during training and to evaluate the relative importance of personal characteristics and psychological states in predicting clinical performance. Design: Cohort study utilizing prospective, serial surveys of emotions (anxiety, depression, competence) and attitudes (satisfaction with the decision to become a physician) among two classes of internal medicine residents during all years of their training. Subjects completed a socio-demographic survey at the conclusion of training, and faculty-assigned clinical ranks and examination scores were used to rate their clinical performances. Main results: Personal characteristics had a stronger relationship to psychological states during the first training year than in subsequent years. The highest association was found for depression, for which 25% of the variation was accounted for by personal characteristics. The combination of personal characteristics and psychological states explained 48% of the variation in clinical ranks and 38% of the variation in American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination scores. Conclusion: There are recognizable relationships among the personal characteristics of residents, their psychologic states during training, and their clinical performances. These results should be helpful to program directors and faculty in identifying potentially weak residents and avoiding pitfalls when working with troubled residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-154
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Psychology
Depression
Mental Competency
Emotions
Cohort Studies
Anxiety
Demography
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Predictors of clinical performance among internal medicine residents. / Girard, Donald; Hickam, D. H.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1991, p. 150-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3f75c205c44f45258bab6e7ff8b7edd4,
title = "Predictors of clinical performance among internal medicine residents",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether personal characteristics influence residents' psychological states during training and to evaluate the relative importance of personal characteristics and psychological states in predicting clinical performance. Design: Cohort study utilizing prospective, serial surveys of emotions (anxiety, depression, competence) and attitudes (satisfaction with the decision to become a physician) among two classes of internal medicine residents during all years of their training. Subjects completed a socio-demographic survey at the conclusion of training, and faculty-assigned clinical ranks and examination scores were used to rate their clinical performances. Main results: Personal characteristics had a stronger relationship to psychological states during the first training year than in subsequent years. The highest association was found for depression, for which 25{\%} of the variation was accounted for by personal characteristics. The combination of personal characteristics and psychological states explained 48{\%} of the variation in clinical ranks and 38{\%} of the variation in American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination scores. Conclusion: There are recognizable relationships among the personal characteristics of residents, their psychologic states during training, and their clinical performances. These results should be helpful to program directors and faculty in identifying potentially weak residents and avoiding pitfalls when working with troubled residents.",
author = "Donald Girard and Hickam, {D. H.}",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "150--154",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of clinical performance among internal medicine residents

AU - Girard, Donald

AU - Hickam, D. H.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - Objective: To determine whether personal characteristics influence residents' psychological states during training and to evaluate the relative importance of personal characteristics and psychological states in predicting clinical performance. Design: Cohort study utilizing prospective, serial surveys of emotions (anxiety, depression, competence) and attitudes (satisfaction with the decision to become a physician) among two classes of internal medicine residents during all years of their training. Subjects completed a socio-demographic survey at the conclusion of training, and faculty-assigned clinical ranks and examination scores were used to rate their clinical performances. Main results: Personal characteristics had a stronger relationship to psychological states during the first training year than in subsequent years. The highest association was found for depression, for which 25% of the variation was accounted for by personal characteristics. The combination of personal characteristics and psychological states explained 48% of the variation in clinical ranks and 38% of the variation in American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination scores. Conclusion: There are recognizable relationships among the personal characteristics of residents, their psychologic states during training, and their clinical performances. These results should be helpful to program directors and faculty in identifying potentially weak residents and avoiding pitfalls when working with troubled residents.

AB - Objective: To determine whether personal characteristics influence residents' psychological states during training and to evaluate the relative importance of personal characteristics and psychological states in predicting clinical performance. Design: Cohort study utilizing prospective, serial surveys of emotions (anxiety, depression, competence) and attitudes (satisfaction with the decision to become a physician) among two classes of internal medicine residents during all years of their training. Subjects completed a socio-demographic survey at the conclusion of training, and faculty-assigned clinical ranks and examination scores were used to rate their clinical performances. Main results: Personal characteristics had a stronger relationship to psychological states during the first training year than in subsequent years. The highest association was found for depression, for which 25% of the variation was accounted for by personal characteristics. The combination of personal characteristics and psychological states explained 48% of the variation in clinical ranks and 38% of the variation in American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination scores. Conclusion: There are recognizable relationships among the personal characteristics of residents, their psychologic states during training, and their clinical performances. These results should be helpful to program directors and faculty in identifying potentially weak residents and avoiding pitfalls when working with troubled residents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026090728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026090728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2023023

AN - SCOPUS:0026090728

VL - 6

SP - 150

EP - 154

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

IS - 2

ER -