Plasma phospholipids, non-esterified plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxylipids are associated with BMI

C. Austin Pickens, Lorraine M. Sordillo, Sarah S. Comstock, William Harris, Kari Hortos, Bruce Kovan, Jenifer I. Fenton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The obese lipid profile is associated with increased free fatty acids and triacylglycerides. Currently, little is known about the plasma lipid species associated with obesity. In this study, we compared plasma lipid fatty acid (FA) profiles as a function of BMI. Profiling phospholipid (PL) FAs and their respective oxylipids could predict which obese individuals are more likely to suffer from diseases associated with chronic inflammation or oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship between BMI and plasma PL (PPL) FA composition in 126 men using a quantitative gas chromatography analysis. BMI was inversely associated with both PPL nervonic and linoleic acid (LA) but was positively associated with both dihomo-γ-linolenic and palmitoleic acid. Compared to lean individuals, obese participants were more likely to have ω-6 FAs, except arachidonic acid and LA, incorporated into PPLs. Obese participants were less likely to have EPA and DHA incorporated into PPLs compared to lean participants. Non-esterified plasma PUFA and oxylipid analysis showed ω-6 oxylipids were more abundant in the obese plasma pool. These ω-6 oxylipids are associated with increased angiogenesis (i.e. epoxyeicosatrienoates), reactive oxygen species (i.e. 9-hydroxyeicosatetraenoate), and inflammation resolution (i.e. Lipoxin A4). In summary, BMI is directly associated with specific PPL FA and increased ω-6 oxylipids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-40
Number of pages10
JournalProstaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Phospholipids
Plasmas
Fatty Acids
Linoleic Acid
Lipids
Inflammation
Oxidative stress
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Arachidonic Acid
Gas chromatography
Gas Chromatography
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Obesity
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Human
  • Inflammation
  • Lipidome
  • Nervonic acid
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Plasma phospholipids, non-esterified plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxylipids are associated with BMI. / Pickens, C. Austin; Sordillo, Lorraine M.; Comstock, Sarah S.; Harris, William; Hortos, Kari; Kovan, Bruce; Fenton, Jenifer I.

In: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Vol. 95, 01.04.2015, p. 31-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pickens, C. Austin ; Sordillo, Lorraine M. ; Comstock, Sarah S. ; Harris, William ; Hortos, Kari ; Kovan, Bruce ; Fenton, Jenifer I. / Plasma phospholipids, non-esterified plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxylipids are associated with BMI. In: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. 2015 ; Vol. 95. pp. 31-40.
@article{107daa9d1184466c995365fbf5c01d66,
title = "Plasma phospholipids, non-esterified plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxylipids are associated with BMI",
abstract = "The obese lipid profile is associated with increased free fatty acids and triacylglycerides. Currently, little is known about the plasma lipid species associated with obesity. In this study, we compared plasma lipid fatty acid (FA) profiles as a function of BMI. Profiling phospholipid (PL) FAs and their respective oxylipids could predict which obese individuals are more likely to suffer from diseases associated with chronic inflammation or oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship between BMI and plasma PL (PPL) FA composition in 126 men using a quantitative gas chromatography analysis. BMI was inversely associated with both PPL nervonic and linoleic acid (LA) but was positively associated with both dihomo-γ-linolenic and palmitoleic acid. Compared to lean individuals, obese participants were more likely to have ω-6 FAs, except arachidonic acid and LA, incorporated into PPLs. Obese participants were less likely to have EPA and DHA incorporated into PPLs compared to lean participants. Non-esterified plasma PUFA and oxylipid analysis showed ω-6 oxylipids were more abundant in the obese plasma pool. These ω-6 oxylipids are associated with increased angiogenesis (i.e. epoxyeicosatrienoates), reactive oxygen species (i.e. 9-hydroxyeicosatetraenoate), and inflammation resolution (i.e. Lipoxin A4). In summary, BMI is directly associated with specific PPL FA and increased ω-6 oxylipids.",
keywords = "Biomarker, Human, Inflammation, Lipidome, Nervonic acid, Obesity",
author = "Pickens, {C. Austin} and Sordillo, {Lorraine M.} and Comstock, {Sarah S.} and William Harris and Kari Hortos and Bruce Kovan and Fenton, {Jenifer I.}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.plefa.2014.12.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "95",
pages = "31--40",
journal = "Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids",
issn = "0952-3278",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma phospholipids, non-esterified plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxylipids are associated with BMI

AU - Pickens, C. Austin

AU - Sordillo, Lorraine M.

AU - Comstock, Sarah S.

AU - Harris, William

AU - Hortos, Kari

AU - Kovan, Bruce

AU - Fenton, Jenifer I.

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - The obese lipid profile is associated with increased free fatty acids and triacylglycerides. Currently, little is known about the plasma lipid species associated with obesity. In this study, we compared plasma lipid fatty acid (FA) profiles as a function of BMI. Profiling phospholipid (PL) FAs and their respective oxylipids could predict which obese individuals are more likely to suffer from diseases associated with chronic inflammation or oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship between BMI and plasma PL (PPL) FA composition in 126 men using a quantitative gas chromatography analysis. BMI was inversely associated with both PPL nervonic and linoleic acid (LA) but was positively associated with both dihomo-γ-linolenic and palmitoleic acid. Compared to lean individuals, obese participants were more likely to have ω-6 FAs, except arachidonic acid and LA, incorporated into PPLs. Obese participants were less likely to have EPA and DHA incorporated into PPLs compared to lean participants. Non-esterified plasma PUFA and oxylipid analysis showed ω-6 oxylipids were more abundant in the obese plasma pool. These ω-6 oxylipids are associated with increased angiogenesis (i.e. epoxyeicosatrienoates), reactive oxygen species (i.e. 9-hydroxyeicosatetraenoate), and inflammation resolution (i.e. Lipoxin A4). In summary, BMI is directly associated with specific PPL FA and increased ω-6 oxylipids.

AB - The obese lipid profile is associated with increased free fatty acids and triacylglycerides. Currently, little is known about the plasma lipid species associated with obesity. In this study, we compared plasma lipid fatty acid (FA) profiles as a function of BMI. Profiling phospholipid (PL) FAs and their respective oxylipids could predict which obese individuals are more likely to suffer from diseases associated with chronic inflammation or oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship between BMI and plasma PL (PPL) FA composition in 126 men using a quantitative gas chromatography analysis. BMI was inversely associated with both PPL nervonic and linoleic acid (LA) but was positively associated with both dihomo-γ-linolenic and palmitoleic acid. Compared to lean individuals, obese participants were more likely to have ω-6 FAs, except arachidonic acid and LA, incorporated into PPLs. Obese participants were less likely to have EPA and DHA incorporated into PPLs compared to lean participants. Non-esterified plasma PUFA and oxylipid analysis showed ω-6 oxylipids were more abundant in the obese plasma pool. These ω-6 oxylipids are associated with increased angiogenesis (i.e. epoxyeicosatrienoates), reactive oxygen species (i.e. 9-hydroxyeicosatetraenoate), and inflammation resolution (i.e. Lipoxin A4). In summary, BMI is directly associated with specific PPL FA and increased ω-6 oxylipids.

KW - Biomarker

KW - Human

KW - Inflammation

KW - Lipidome

KW - Nervonic acid

KW - Obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924759330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924759330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.plefa.2014.12.001

DO - 10.1016/j.plefa.2014.12.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 25559239

AN - SCOPUS:84924759330

VL - 95

SP - 31

EP - 40

JO - Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids

JF - Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids

SN - 0952-3278

ER -