Physicians' early perspectives on Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations

Ronald Stock, Jennifer Hall, Anna Marie Chang, Deborah Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Through development of Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs), Oregon's version of the Accountable Care Organization (ACO) for Medicaid beneficiaries, Oregon is redesigning the healthcare system delivering care to some of its most vulnerable citizens. While clinicians are central to healthcare transformation, little is known about the impact on their role. The aim of this study was to understand the current and perceived effect CCO-related changes have on Oregon physicians' professional and personal lives. Methods: This qualitative observational study involved semi-structured interviews, conducted between March and October, 2013, of twenty-two purposively selected physicians who varied in years of practice, gender, employment status, specialty, and geographic location from three different CCOs. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze data. Results: Physicians expressed uncertainty and ambiguity about the CCO model, reporting minor financial changes in the first year, but anticipating future reimbursement changes; new team-based care roles and responsibilities, accountability for quality incentive measures; and effects of CCO implementation on their personal lives. To meet CCO model changes and requirements, physicians requested collegial networking, team-based care training, and data system and information technology support for undergoing health system transformation. Conclusions: Although perhaps not immediate, healthcare reform can have a real and perceived impact on physicians' professional and personal lives. Implications: Attention to the impact of healthcare reform on physicians' personal and professional lives is important to ensure strategies are implemented to maintain a viable workforce, professional satisfaction, financial sustainability, and quality of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealthcare
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 14 2015

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Organizations
Physicians
Health Care Reform
Accountable Care Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Geographic Locations
Quality of Health Care
Social Responsibility
Medicaid
Information Systems
Uncertainty
Observational Studies
Motivation
Interviews
Technology
Health

Keywords

  • Accountable Care Organization
  • Coordinated Care Organization
  • Healthcare reform
  • Physician well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Physicians' early perspectives on Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations. / Stock, Ronald; Hall, Jennifer; Chang, Anna Marie; Cohen, Deborah.

In: Healthcare, 14.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stock, Ronald ; Hall, Jennifer ; Chang, Anna Marie ; Cohen, Deborah. / Physicians' early perspectives on Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations. In: Healthcare. 2015.
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