Phenotypic Changes in Immune Cell Subsets Reflect Increased Infarct Volume in Male vs. Female Mice

Anirban Banerjee, Jianming Wang, Sheetal Bodhankar, Arthur Vandenbark, Stephanie J. Murphy, Halina Offner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inflammatory responses in the brain after cerebral ischemia have been studied extensively in male mice, but not female mice, thus potentially giving a less-than-accurate view of gender associated pathological processes. In humans, cerebral infarcts are typically smaller in premenopausal females than in age-matched males. In the current study, we confirmed smaller infarcts in female vs. male mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion and 96 h of reperfusion. Moreover, we explored immunological alterations related to this difference and found that the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens in males than females, with increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 and CD44. In contrast, the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens of females than males, leading to the identification of a small but distinct population of IL-10-secreting CD8+CD122+ suppressor T cells that were also increased in females. Finally, we observed that males have a greater percentage of activated macrophages/microglia in the brain than females, as well as increased expression of the VLA-4 adhesion molecule in both brain and spleen. This new information suggesting gender-dependent immunological mechanisms in stroke implies that effective treatments for human stroke may also be gender specific.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)554-563
Number of pages10
JournalTranslational Stroke Research
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Spleen
T-Lymphocytes
Brain
Stroke
Integrin alpha4beta1
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Microglia
Pathologic Processes
Brain Ischemia
Interleukin-10
Reperfusion
Macrophages
Population

Keywords

  • Activated T cells
  • Experimental stroke
  • Gender bias
  • Immune markers
  • Ischemia
  • Suppressor T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Phenotypic Changes in Immune Cell Subsets Reflect Increased Infarct Volume in Male vs. Female Mice. / Banerjee, Anirban; Wang, Jianming; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Vandenbark, Arthur; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina.

In: Translational Stroke Research, Vol. 4, No. 5, 2013, p. 554-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Banerjee, Anirban ; Wang, Jianming ; Bodhankar, Sheetal ; Vandenbark, Arthur ; Murphy, Stephanie J. ; Offner, Halina. / Phenotypic Changes in Immune Cell Subsets Reflect Increased Infarct Volume in Male vs. Female Mice. In: Translational Stroke Research. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 554-563.
@article{4f67a05a5dee4eafa415ba5509b2dc42,
title = "Phenotypic Changes in Immune Cell Subsets Reflect Increased Infarct Volume in Male vs. Female Mice",
abstract = "Inflammatory responses in the brain after cerebral ischemia have been studied extensively in male mice, but not female mice, thus potentially giving a less-than-accurate view of gender associated pathological processes. In humans, cerebral infarcts are typically smaller in premenopausal females than in age-matched males. In the current study, we confirmed smaller infarcts in female vs. male mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion and 96 h of reperfusion. Moreover, we explored immunological alterations related to this difference and found that the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens in males than females, with increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 and CD44. In contrast, the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens of females than males, leading to the identification of a small but distinct population of IL-10-secreting CD8+CD122+ suppressor T cells that were also increased in females. Finally, we observed that males have a greater percentage of activated macrophages/microglia in the brain than females, as well as increased expression of the VLA-4 adhesion molecule in both brain and spleen. This new information suggesting gender-dependent immunological mechanisms in stroke implies that effective treatments for human stroke may also be gender specific.",
keywords = "Activated T cells, Experimental stroke, Gender bias, Immune markers, Ischemia, Suppressor T cells",
author = "Anirban Banerjee and Jianming Wang and Sheetal Bodhankar and Arthur Vandenbark and Murphy, {Stephanie J.} and Halina Offner",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s12975-013-0268-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "554--563",
journal = "Translational Stroke Research",
issn = "1868-4483",
publisher = "Springer US",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phenotypic Changes in Immune Cell Subsets Reflect Increased Infarct Volume in Male vs. Female Mice

AU - Banerjee, Anirban

AU - Wang, Jianming

AU - Bodhankar, Sheetal

AU - Vandenbark, Arthur

AU - Murphy, Stephanie J.

AU - Offner, Halina

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Inflammatory responses in the brain after cerebral ischemia have been studied extensively in male mice, but not female mice, thus potentially giving a less-than-accurate view of gender associated pathological processes. In humans, cerebral infarcts are typically smaller in premenopausal females than in age-matched males. In the current study, we confirmed smaller infarcts in female vs. male mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion and 96 h of reperfusion. Moreover, we explored immunological alterations related to this difference and found that the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens in males than females, with increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 and CD44. In contrast, the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens of females than males, leading to the identification of a small but distinct population of IL-10-secreting CD8+CD122+ suppressor T cells that were also increased in females. Finally, we observed that males have a greater percentage of activated macrophages/microglia in the brain than females, as well as increased expression of the VLA-4 adhesion molecule in both brain and spleen. This new information suggesting gender-dependent immunological mechanisms in stroke implies that effective treatments for human stroke may also be gender specific.

AB - Inflammatory responses in the brain after cerebral ischemia have been studied extensively in male mice, but not female mice, thus potentially giving a less-than-accurate view of gender associated pathological processes. In humans, cerebral infarcts are typically smaller in premenopausal females than in age-matched males. In the current study, we confirmed smaller infarcts in female vs. male mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion and 96 h of reperfusion. Moreover, we explored immunological alterations related to this difference and found that the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens in males than females, with increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 and CD44. In contrast, the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in spleens of females than males, leading to the identification of a small but distinct population of IL-10-secreting CD8+CD122+ suppressor T cells that were also increased in females. Finally, we observed that males have a greater percentage of activated macrophages/microglia in the brain than females, as well as increased expression of the VLA-4 adhesion molecule in both brain and spleen. This new information suggesting gender-dependent immunological mechanisms in stroke implies that effective treatments for human stroke may also be gender specific.

KW - Activated T cells

KW - Experimental stroke

KW - Gender bias

KW - Immune markers

KW - Ischemia

KW - Suppressor T cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884844820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884844820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12975-013-0268-z

DO - 10.1007/s12975-013-0268-z

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 554

EP - 563

JO - Translational Stroke Research

JF - Translational Stroke Research

SN - 1868-4483

IS - 5

ER -