Phasic sleep events shape cognitive function after traumatic brain injury: Implications for the study of sleep in neurodevelopmental disorders

Carolyn E. Jones, Miranda Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The biological functions of sleep have long eluded the medical and research community. In four consecutive issues of AIMS Neuroscience, original and review manuscripts were recently published regarding the mechanisms and function of sleep. These articles highlight the well-timed topic of quantitative sleep markers and cognitive functioning as one of extensive interest within the field of neuroscience. Our commentary on the original research performed by Cote, Milner, and Speth (2015) brings attention to the importance of examining individual differences in sleep and cognition in subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and provides support for conducting similar sleep analyses in neurodevelopmental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-236
Number of pages5
JournalAIMS Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Cognition
Sleep
Neurosciences
Manuscripts
Individuality
Biomedical Research
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Traumatic Brain Injury
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Phasic sleep events shape cognitive function after traumatic brain injury : Implications for the study of sleep in neurodevelopmental disorders. / Jones, Carolyn E.; Lim, Miranda.

In: AIMS Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 2, 01.01.2016, p. 232-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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