Pet-associated illness

Diane Elliot, Susan Tolle, Linn Goldberg, J. B. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An estimated 55 million dogs and nearly as many cats are kept as pets in the United States. Although over 30 human illnesses can be acquired from pets, 2 owners are often poorly informed about measures that prevent acquisition of these conditions. Despite the frequency of contact between pet and owner, most pet-associated illnesses are infrequent, and health care providers may not be aware of their patterns of transmission or of preventive measures. The topic of pathogens that are transmitted from animals to human beings (zoonoses) has received brief editorial attention recently. In this article, we review in more detail the epidemiology, diagnosis, and therapy of illnesses acquired from dogs and cats. In addition, we present practical guidelines to minimize the risk of contracting these disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)985-995
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume313
Issue number16
StatePublished - 1985

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Pets
Cats
Dogs
Zoonoses
Health Personnel
Epidemiology
Guidelines
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Elliot, D., Tolle, S., Goldberg, L., & Miller, J. B. (1985). Pet-associated illness. New England Journal of Medicine, 313(16), 985-995.

Pet-associated illness. / Elliot, Diane; Tolle, Susan; Goldberg, Linn; Miller, J. B.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 313, No. 16, 1985, p. 985-995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elliot, D, Tolle, S, Goldberg, L & Miller, JB 1985, 'Pet-associated illness', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 313, no. 16, pp. 985-995.
Elliot D, Tolle S, Goldberg L, Miller JB. Pet-associated illness. New England Journal of Medicine. 1985;313(16):985-995.
Elliot, Diane ; Tolle, Susan ; Goldberg, Linn ; Miller, J. B. / Pet-associated illness. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1985 ; Vol. 313, No. 16. pp. 985-995.
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