Perioperative management of a neurosurgical patient requiring antiplatelet therapy

Khoi Than, Pratik Rohatgi, Thomas J. Wilson, B. Gregory Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In patients who undergo neurovascular stent placement with postoperative dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent in-stent thrombosis, there is no protocol for balancing the risk of acute stent thrombosis and bleeding if urgent neurosurgical procedures are required. We detail perioperative management of dual antiplatelet therapy in a 66-year-old man with a dolichoectatic aneurysm of the basilar artery treated with a Pipeline stent. Postoperatively, the patient was placed on aspirin and clopidogrel to prevent in-stent thrombosis. One month after the procedure, his neurological status declined secondary to obstructive hydrocephalus. His condition necessitated urgent placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, despite the dual antiplatelet therapy for the flow-diverting Pipeline stent. Aspirin and clopidogrel were discontinued seven days prior to the planned shunt placement. To minimize time off antiplatelet therapy, aspirin was immediately replaced with ibuprofen. Eptifibatide was then started three days prior to surgery. The ibuprofen/eptifibatide bridge was discontinued at midnight prior to surgery. Aspirin was restarted on the first postoperative day and clopidogrel was restarted on the second postoperative day. The patient tolerated shunt placement without excessive bleeding or hemorrhagic complications. During the remainder of his hospital course, no evidence of stent thrombosis or intracranial hemorrhage was noted. We conclude that management of antiplatelet prophylaxis for neurovascular stent thrombosis in patients requiring urgent neurosurgical procedures may be successfully achieved by bridging aspirin and clopidogrel with ibuprofen and eptifibatide in the preoperative period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1316-1320
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

clopidogrel
Stents
Aspirin
Thrombosis
Ibuprofen
Neurosurgical Procedures
Therapeutics
Hemorrhage
Preoperative Period
Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Intracranial Aneurysm
Hydrocephalus

Keywords

  • Antiplatelet therapy
  • Aspirin
  • Clopidogrel
  • Eptifibatide
  • Ibuprofen
  • Neurovascular stent
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Perioperative management of a neurosurgical patient requiring antiplatelet therapy. / Than, Khoi; Rohatgi, Pratik; Wilson, Thomas J.; Gregory Thompson, B.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 19, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 1316-1320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Than, Khoi ; Rohatgi, Pratik ; Wilson, Thomas J. ; Gregory Thompson, B. / Perioperative management of a neurosurgical patient requiring antiplatelet therapy. In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 2012 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 1316-1320.
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