Performance-based evaluation of flight student landings: Implications for risk management

Ryan Olson, John Austin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beginning flight students (N = 28) participated in a performance-based landing measurement system. Students recorded contextual variables for each flight then students and instructors independently rated 12 dimensions of the last landing as meeting or deviating from standards in a specific fashion. Several contextual variables were correlated with errors including studying requirements (r = -. 11, p <.05), and errors decreased as students completed lessons (r = -.34, p <.01). Flare and follow-through problems were most common, occurring on 48.5% and 43.3% of landings, respectively. The project highlights the potential benefits of student self-evaluation and instructor-student collaborations and promotes the value of behavior-based safety processes in aviation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-112
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Aviation Psychology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Risk Management
Risk management
Landing
risk management
flight
Students
evaluation
performance
student
instructor
Aviation
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
air traffic
Safety
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Performance-based evaluation of flight student landings : Implications for risk management. / Olson, Ryan; Austin, John.

In: International Journal of Aviation Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2006, p. 97-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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